IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ibf/ijmmre/v10y2017i1p19-44.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Mediating Effect Of Felt Accountability On The Relationship Between Personality And Job Satisfaction

Author

Listed:
  • M. Todd Royle

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to examine the potential that the “Big Five†dimensions of personality determine whether or not individuals feel accountable for their job-related behaviors and if that predicts whether or not they feel satisfied with their jobs. Drawing on disparate, but relevant research form these three fields, this research proposes that the five personality dimensions differentially predict feelings of individual answerability for work-related attitudes and behaviors and concomitant levels of job satisfaction. The results suggested that four of the “Big Five†factors (i.e., conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness and emotional stability) predicted felt accountability and that felt accountability partially intervened between them and job satisfaction. For human resource managers, the findings suggest personality metrics are still useful selection tools because they help place more answerable, involved, employees who are more likely to feel satisfied with their jobs

Suggested Citation

  • M. Todd Royle, 2017. "The Mediating Effect Of Felt Accountability On The Relationship Between Personality And Job Satisfaction," International Journal of Management and Marketing Research, The Institute for Business and Finance Research, vol. 10(1), pages 19-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibf:ijmmre:v:10:y:2017:i:1:p:19-44
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.theibfr2.com/RePEc/ibf/ijmmre/ijmmr-v10n1-2017/IJMMR-V10N1-2017-2.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. W.D. McCausland & K. Pouliakas & I. Theodossiou, 2005. "Some are Punished and Some are Rewarded: A Study of the Impact of Performance Pay on Job Satisfaction," Labor and Demography 0505019, EconWPA.
    2. M. Todd Royle & Angela T. Hall, 2012. "THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN McCLELLAND’S THEORY OF NEEDS, FEELING INDIVIDUALLY ACCOUNTABLE, AND INFORMAL ACCOUNTABILITY FOR OTHERS," International Journal of Management and Marketing Research, The Institute for Business and Finance Research, vol. 5(1), pages 21-42.
    3. Freeman, Richard B, 1978. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(2), pages 135-141, May.
    4. Alina Ileana Petrescu & Rob Simmons, 2008. "Human resource management practices and workers' job satisfaction," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 29(7), pages 651-667, November.
    5. Richard Layard, 2006. "Happiness and Public Policy: a Challenge to the Profession," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(510), pages 24-33, March.
    6. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
    7. Boselie, J.P.P.E.F. & van der Wiele, A., 2001. "Employee Perceptions of HRM and TQM and the Effects on Satisfaction and INtention to Leave," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2001-42-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    8. Andrew A. Luchak, 2003. "What Kind of Voice Do Loyal Employees Use?," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(1), pages 115-134, March.
    9. repec:ibf:ijmmre:v:5:y:2012:i:2:p:21-42 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Henry Kaiser, 1974. "An index of factorial simplicity," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 39(1), pages 31-36, March.
    11. M. Todd Royle, 2015. "Theoretical Drivers Of Early Career Success For New Entrants To The Job Market," International Journal of Management and Marketing Research, The Institute for Business and Finance Research, vol. 8(1), pages 31-56.
    12. Easterlin, Richard A, 2001. "Income and Happiness: Towards an Unified Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(473), pages 465-484, July.
    13. Clark, Andrew E., 2001. "What really matters in a job? Hedonic measurement using quit data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 223-242, May.
    14. Joseph Henrich & Steve J. Heine & Ara Norenzayan, 2010. "The Weirdest People in the World?," Working Paper Series of the German Council for Social and Economic Data 139, German Council for Social and Economic Data (RatSWD).
    15. David Neumark & Peter Cappelli, 1999. "Do "High Performance" Work Practices Improve Establishment-Level Outcomes?," NBER Working Papers 7374, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Personality; Felt Accountability; Job Satisfaction;

    JEL classification:

    • M10 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - General
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ibf:ijmmre:v:10:y:2017:i:1:p:19-44. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mercedes Jalbert). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.