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The Effect of Patient's Asymmetric Information Problem on Medical Care Utilization with Consideration of a Patient's Ex-ante Health Status

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  • Lim, Jae-Young
  • Jo, Changik

Abstract

Even if a patient's access to health information has been enhanced, a patient still doesn't have enough ability to utilize it. Therefore, a doctor's effort to sincerely communicate with a patient might affect the patient's use of medical care. This paper builds up the empirical model and found the effect of a doctor's effort on patient's medical care use was significant and according to the ex-ante health status of a patient, a doctor's effort influenced a patient's medical care use in different way.

Suggested Citation

  • Lim, Jae-Young & Jo, Changik, 2009. "The Effect of Patient's Asymmetric Information Problem on Medical Care Utilization with Consideration of a Patient's Ex-ante Health Status," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 50(2), pages 37-58, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:hitjec:v:50:y:2009:i:2:p:37-58
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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/18050/1/HJeco0500200370.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Choi, Young-Eun & Ha, Hyung-Serk & Lim, Jae-Young & Lee, Eui-Kyung, 2015. "Revisit The Effect Of The Prenatal Medical Care Use On The Birth Outcome Of Newborn Baby," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 56(2), pages 155-175, December.
    2. Lim, Jae-Young, 2010. "De-mystifying the Inconvenient Truth : Does Ex Post Moral Hazard Indeed Exist in Korean Private Health Insurance Market?," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 51(2), pages 74-92, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    asymmetry of information between doctor and patient; patient's medical care use; doctor's effort to effectively communicate with patients; patient's ex-ante health status;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets

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