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De-mystifying the Inconvenient Truth : Does Ex Post Moral Hazard Indeed Exist in Korean Private Health Insurance Market?

  • Lim, Jae-Young
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    There have been heated debates on whether private health insurance creates moral hazard effects. Despite its importance, however, the moral hazard problem of private health insurance is still controversial and understudied. To empirically examine whether or not moral hazard exists in the Korean private health insurance market, we employed two-stage regression for endogeneity control and the Heckman two-step procedure for sample selection bias control, which are expected to produce consistent estimates. All estimation results do not allow us to detect the presence of the moral hazard effects and imply that people hold private health insurance simply as “safety net”.

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    Article provided by Hitotsubashi University in its journal Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 51 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 (December)
    Pages: 74-92

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    Handle: RePEc:hit:hitjec:v:51:y:2010:i:2:p:74-92
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    1. Claudio Sapelli & Bernardita Vial, 2001. "Self Selection and Moral Hazard in Chilean Health Insurance," Documentos de Trabajo 195, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
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    3. Coulson, N Edward, et al, 1995. "Estimating the Moral-Hazard Effect of Supplemental Medical Insurance in the Demand for Prescription Drugs by the Elderly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 122-26, May.
    4. Wolfe, John R. & Goddeeris, John H., 1991. "Adverse selection, moral hazard, and wealth effects in the medigap insurance market," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 433-459.
    5. Chiappori, Pierre-Andre & Durand, Franck & Geoffard, Pierre-Yves, 1998. "Moral hazard and the demand for physician services: First lessons from a French natural experiment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-5), pages 499-511, May.
    6. Hurd, Michael D. & McGarry, Kathleen, 1997. "Medical insurance and the use of health care services by the elderly," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 129-154, April.
    7. Lim, Jae-Young & Jo, Changik, 2009. "The Effect of Patient's Asymmetric Information Problem on Medical Care Utilization with Consideration of a Patient's Ex-ante Health Status," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 50(2), pages 37-58, December.
    8. Zweifel, Peter & Manning, Willard G., 2000. "Moral hazard and consumer incentives in health care," Handbook of Health Economics, in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 8, pages 409-459 Elsevier.
    9. James J. Heckman, 1976. "The Common Structure of Statistical Models of Truncation, Sample Selection and Limited Dependent Variables and a Simple Estimator for Such Models," NBER Chapters, in: Annals of Economic and Social Measurement, Volume 5, number 4, pages 475-492 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
    11. Puhani, Patrick A, 2000. " The Heckman Correction for Sample Selection and Its Critique," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(1), pages 53-68, February.
    12. Kenneth Bollen & David Guilkey & Thomas Mroz, 1995. "Binary outcomes and endogenous explanatory variables: Tests and solutions with an application to the demand for contraceptive use in tunisia," Demography, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 111-131, February.
    13. Thomas C. Buchmueller & Agnès Couffinhal & Michel Grignon & Marc Perronin, 2002. "Access to Physician Services: Does Supplemental Insurance Matter? Evidence from France," NBER Working Papers 9238, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Ettner, Susan L., 1997. "Adverse selection and the purchase of Medigap insurance by the elderly," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 543-562, October.
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