IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedker/y2012iqivnv.97no.4.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Estimated rules for monetary policy

Author

Listed:
  • George A. Kahn

Abstract

Estimated policy rules describe how monetary policy has responded in the past to key economic indicators. Such rules can be used to evaluate past decisions and help guide the appropriate path for current policy. ; However, there may be unique features of a given economic situation—such as the current binding zero lower bound on interest rates and the desire to manage downside risk to economic activity—that warrant flexibility in following any rule based on past performance. ; Kahn estimates what rules best describe past monetary policies that coincided with periods of favorable economic performance. A rule placing somewhat greater weight on inflation than on output in determining a setting for the federal funds rate describes policy well over these periods and could be a useful guide in the future.

Suggested Citation

  • George A. Kahn, 2012. "Estimated rules for monetary policy," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q IV.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2012:i:qiv:n:v.97no.4
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/econrev/pdf/12q4Kahn.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Evan F. Koenig, 2004. "Monetary policy prospects," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, pages 1-16.
    2. Ball, Laurence, 1999. "Efficient Rules for Monetary Policy," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(1), pages 63-83, April.
    3. Richard Clarida & Jordi Galí & Mark Gertler, 2000. "Monetary Policy Rules and Macroeconomic Stability: Evidence and Some Theory," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(1), pages 147-180.
    4. Coenen Günter & Orphanides Athanasios & Wieland Volker, 2004. "Price Stability and Monetary Policy Effectiveness when Nominal Interest Rates are Bounded at Zero," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 1-25, February.
    5. Fabio Canova, 2009. "What Explains The Great Moderation in the U.S.? A Structural Analysis," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 7(4), pages 697-721, June.
    6. Pier Francesco Asso & George A. Kahn & Robert Leeson, 2007. "The Taylor rule and the transformation of monetary policy," Research Working Paper RWP 07-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    7. George A. Kahn, 2010. "Taylor rule deviations and financial imbalances," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 63-99.
    8. Roberto M. Billi & George A. Kahn, 2008. "What is the optimal inflation rate?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 5-28.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Michael D. Bordo & Pierre L. Siklos, 2015. "Central Bank Credibility: An Historical and Quantitative Exploration," NBER Working Papers 20824, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Kerry B. Hudson & Joaquin L. Vespignani, 2014. "Understanding the Deviations of the Taylor Rule: A New Methodology with an Application to Australia," CAMA Working Papers 2014-78, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    3. Hakkio, Craig S. & Kahn, George A., 2014. "Evaluating monetary policy at the zero lower bound," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 5-32.
    4. Nikolay Markov & Thomas Nitschka, 2013. "Estimating Taylor Rules for Switzerland: Evidence from 2000 to 2012," Working Papers 2013-08, Swiss National Bank.
    5. Marco Jacopo Lombardi & Feng Zhu, 2014. "A shadow policy rate to calibrate US monetary policy at the zero lower bound," BIS Working Papers 452, Bank for International Settlements.
    6. Jens Klose, 2018. "Are Eastern European Taylor Reaction Functions Asymmetric in Inflation or Output: Empirical Evidence for four Countries," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201808, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedker:y:2012:i:qiv:n:v.97no.4. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (LDayrit). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbkcus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.