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Taylor-type rules versus optimal policy in a Markov-switching economy

Listed author(s):
  • Fernando Alexandre

    (NIPE and University of Minho)

  • Pedro Bação

    ()

    (GEMF and Faculdade de Economia, Universidade de Coimbra)

  • Vasco Gabriel

    (Department of Economics, University of Surrey, UK and NIPE-UM)

We analyse the effect of uncertainty concerning the state and the nature of asset price movements on the optimal monetary policy response. Uncertainty is modeled by adding Markov-switching shocks to a DSGE model with capital accumulation. In our analysis we consider both Taylor-type rules and optimal policy. Taylor rules have been shown to provide a good description of US monetary policy. Deviations from its implied interest rates have been associated with risks of financial disruptions. Whereas interest rates in Taylor-type rules respond to a small subset of information, optimal policy considers all state variables and shocks. Our results suggest that, when a bubble bursts, the Taylor rule fails to achieve a soft landing, contrary to the optimal policy.

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File URL: http://gemf.fe.uc.pt/workingpapers/pdf/2008/gemf_2008-02.pdf
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Paper provided by GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra in its series GEMF Working Papers with number 2008-02.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Handle: RePEc:gmf:wpaper:2008-02
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  4. Fernando Alexandre & Pedro Bação & John Driffill, 2007. "Optimal monetary policy with a regime-switching exchange rate in a forward-looking model," NIPE Working Papers 26/2007, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
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