IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fau/fauart/v66y2016i4p278-301.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Estimating Stochastic Volatility and Jumps Using High-Frequency Data and Bayesian Methods

Author

Listed:
  • Milan Ficura

    () (Faculty of Finance and Accounting, University of Economics, Prague)

  • Jiri Witzany

    () (Faculty of Finance and Accounting, University of Economics, Prague)

Abstract

We compare two approaches for estimation of stochastic volatility and jumps in the EUR//USD time series—the non-parametric power-variation approach using high-frequency returns and the parametric Bayesian approach (MCMC estimation of SVJD models) using daily returns. We have found that the estimated jump probabilities based on these two methods are surprisingly uncorrelated (using a rank correlation coefficient). This means that the two methods do not identify jumps on the same days. We further found that the non-parametrically identified jumps are in fact almost indistinguishable from the continuous price volatility at the daily frequency because they are too small. In most cases, the parametric approach using daily data does not in fact identify real jumps (i.e. discontinuous price changes) but rather only large returns caused by continuous price volatility. So if these unusually high daily returns are to be modelled, the parametric approach should be used, but if the goal is to identify the discontinuous price changes in the price evolution, the non-parametric high-frequency-based methods should be preferred. Among other results, we further found that the non-parametrically identified jumps exhibit only weak clustering (analyzed using the Hawkes process), but relatively strong size dependency. In the case of parametrically identified jumps, no clustering was present. We further found that after the beginning of 2012, the amount of jumps in the EUR//USD series greatly increased, but the results of our study still hold.

Suggested Citation

  • Milan Ficura & Jiri Witzany, 2016. "Estimating Stochastic Volatility and Jumps Using High-Frequency Data and Bayesian Methods," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 66(4), pages 278-301, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:66:y:2016:i:4:p:278-301
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journal.fsv.cuni.cz/storage/1358_fau_04_2016_278_301_witzany.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Corsi, Fulvio & Pirino, Davide & Renò, Roberto, 2010. "Threshold bipower variation and the impact of jumps on volatility forecasting," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 159(2), pages 276-288, December.
    2. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Peter F. Christoffersen & Francis X. Diebold, 2005. "Volatility Forecasting," PIER Working Paper Archive 05-011, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.
    3. Suzanne S. Lee & Per A. Mykland, 2008. "Jumps in Financial Markets: A New Nonparametric Test and Jump Dynamics," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 21(6), pages 2535-2563, November.
    4. Aït-Sahalia, Yacine & Cacho-Diaz, Julio & Laeven, Roger J.A., 2015. "Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(3), pages 585-606.
    5. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold & Paul Labys, 2003. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(2), pages 579-625, March.
    6. Jan Hanousek & Evzen Kocenda & Jan Novotny, 2014. "Price jumps on European stock markets," Borsa Istanbul Review, Research and Business Development Department, Borsa Istanbul, vol. 14(1), pages 10-22, March.
    7. Jiří Witzany, 2013. "Estimating Correlated Jumps and Stochastic Volatilities," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, pages 251-283.
    8. Emmanuel Bacry & Iacopo Mastromatteo & Jean-Franc{c}ois Muzy, 2015. "Hawkes processes in finance," Papers 1502.04592, arXiv.org, revised May 2015.
    9. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen, 2004. "Power and Bipower Variation with Stochastic Volatility and Jumps," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 2(1), pages 1-37.
    10. Jacquier, Eric & Polson, Nicholas G & Rossi, Peter E, 2002. "Bayesian Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Models," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 69-87, January.
    11. Jacquier, Eric & Polson, Nicholas G & Rossi, Peter E, 1994. "Bayesian Analysis of Stochastic Volatility Models: Comments: Reply," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 12(4), pages 413-417, October.
    12. Torben G. Andersen & Tim Bollerslev & Francis X. Diebold, 2007. "Roughing It Up: Including Jump Components in the Measurement, Modeling, and Forecasting of Return Volatility," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(4), pages 701-720, November.
    13. Andersen, Torben G & Bollerslev, Tim, 1998. "Answering the Skeptics: Yes, Standard Volatility Models Do Provide Accurate Forecasts," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 39(4), pages 885-905, November.
    14. repec:bla:restud:v:65:y:1998:i:3:p:361-93 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Peter Reinhard Hansen & Asger Lunde & Neil Shephard, 2008. "Designing Realized Kernels to Measure the ex post Variation of Equity Prices in the Presence of Noise," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 76(6), pages 1481-1536, November.
    16. Bjørn Eraker, 2004. "Do Stock Prices and Volatility Jump? Reconciling Evidence from Spot and Option Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 59(3), pages 1367-1404, June.
    17. Markku Lanne, 2006. "Forecasting Realized Volatility by Decomposition," Economics Working Papers ECO2006/20, European University Institute.
    18. Zhang, Lan & Mykland, Per A. & Ait-Sahalia, Yacine, 2005. "A Tale of Two Time Scales: Determining Integrated Volatility With Noisy High-Frequency Data," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 100, pages 1394-1411, December.
    19. Prosper Dovonon & Sílvia Gonçalves & Ulrich Hounyo & Nour Meddahi, 2016. "Bootstrapping high-frequency jump tests," CIRANO Working Papers 2016s-24, CIRANO.
    20. Andersen, Torben G. & Dobrev, Dobrislav & Schaumburg, Ernst, 2014. "A Robust Neighborhood Truncation Approach To Estimation Of Integrated Quarticity," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 30(01), pages 3-59, February.
    21. Viktor Todorov, 2010. "Variance Risk-Premium Dynamics: The Role of Jumps," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 23(1), pages 345-383, January.
    22. Shephard, Neil (ed.), 2005. "Stochastic Volatility: Selected Readings," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199257201.
    23. Andras Fulop & Junye Li & Jun Yu, 2015. "Self-Exciting Jumps, Learning, and Asset Pricing Implications," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 28(3), pages 876-912.
    24. Carla Ysusi, 2006. "Detecting Jumps in High-Frequency Financial Series Using Multipower Variation," Working Papers 2006-10, Banco de México.
    25. Novotný, Jan & Petrov, Dmitri & Urga, Giovanni, 2015. "Trading price jump clusters in foreign exchange markets," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 66-92.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    stochastic volatility; Bayesian inference; quadratic variation; realized variance; bipower variation; self-exciting jumps;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • G1 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fau:fauart:v:66:y:2016:i:4:p:278-301. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lenka Herrmannova) or (Christopher F Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/icunicz.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.