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Outward Labour Migration in the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia after the EU Enlargement in 2004

Author

Listed:
  • Wadim Strielkowski

    () (Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, Prague, Czech Republic)

  • Petr Filipec

    () (Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, Prague, Czech Republic)

  • Miroslav Štefánik

    () (Slovak Academy of Sciences, Institute of Economic Research, Bratislava, Slovak Republic)

  • Karolina Kowalska

    () (University of Warsaw, Faculty of Economic Sciences, Warsaw, Poland)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the outward labour migration from the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia to predominantly EU15 countries. It describes the incentives for emigration and evaluates the effect of the EU accession in 2004 for all three countries using the regional data. Our empirical estimation suggests that while outward labour migration from Poland was positively related to lagged emigration and negatively related to employment rate and average real wage, this relationship was less obvious and significant in the case of the Czech Republic and Slovakia. In addition, our results also imply that the EU accession had only indirect impact on emigration for three countries in question.

Suggested Citation

  • Wadim Strielkowski & Petr Filipec & Miroslav Štefánik & Karolina Kowalska, 2013. "Outward Labour Migration in the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia after the EU Enlargement in 2004," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 7(1), pages 042-054, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:fau:aucocz:au2013_042
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rotte, Ralph & Vogler, Michael, 1998. "Determinants of International Migration: Empirical Evidence for Migration from Developing Countries to Germany," CEPR Discussion Papers 1920, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Zhao, Yaohui, 1999. "Labor Migration and Earnings Differences: The Case of Rural China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(4), pages 767-782, July.
    3. Wadim Strielkowski, 2007. "A Living Worth Leaving? Economic Incentives and Migration Flows: The Case of Czechoslovak Labour Migration," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2007(3), pages 252-264.
    4. Katz, Eliakim & Stark, Oded, 1986. "Labor Migration and Risk Aversion in Less Developed Countries," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(1), pages 134-149, January.
    5. Gordon H. Hanson, 2007. "Emigration, Labor Supply, and Earnings in Mexico," NBER Chapters,in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 289-328 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Ondřej Glazar & Wadim Strielkowski, 2010. "Turkey and the European Union: Possible Incidence of the EU Accession on Migration Flows," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(3), pages 218-235.
    7. Wadim Strielkowski & Cathal O’Donoghue, 2006. "Ready to Go? EU Enlargement and Migration Potential: Lessons for the Czech Republic in the Context of Irish Migration Experience," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2006(1), pages 14-28.
    8. Harris, John R & Todaro, Michael P, 1970. "Migration, Unemployment & Development: A Two-Sector Analysis," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 60(1), pages 126-142, March.
    9. Abdurrahman Aydemir & George J. Borjas, 2006. "A Comparative Analysis of the Labor Market Impact of International Migration: Canada, Mexico, and the United States," NBER Working Papers 12327, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour migration; emigration; EU Enlargement; Czech Republic; Poland; Slovakia;

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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