IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Limit Orders, Trading Activity, and Transactions Costs in Equity Futures in an Electronic Trading Environment

  • Lorne N. Switzer

    ()

    (Concordia University)

  • Haibo Fan

    (Concordia University)

The behaviour of limit order quotes and trading activity are studied using a unique and rich database that includes the identity of market participants from a fully automated derivatives market. The analysis is performed using transactions records for three aggregated trader types and three trade identifiers, with trades stamped in milliseconds for the SXF, the equity futures contract of the Montreal Exchange. The identifiers distinguish trades between principals; agency based trades, as well as transactions that are conducted for risk management as opposed to speculative purposes. Agency related trades are shown to represent the largest amount of trading activity relative to other account types. Over 90% of trades in this electronic market are limit orders. The limit order book, especially the depth 1 order, has a dominant role in providing liquidity and in explaining market participants’ trading behaviour. Participants in the SXF reference their trades to the best limit order depth. Hence, investors with large positions or investors who want to build a large position have to strategically split large orders to close/build their position, according to the depth of the best limit order, to ameliorate price impact and information leakage effects. In addition, the results show that traditionally measured spreads have no relationship with trading costs.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.era.org.tr/makaleler/2041051.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Article provided by Econometric Research Association in its journal International Econometric Review.

Volume (Year): 2 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 11-35

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:erh:journl:v:2:y:2010:i:1:p:11-35
Contact details of provider: Postal: Sairler Sokak, No:32/C, Gaziosmanpasa, Ankara, Turkey
Phone: + 90 312 447 51 95
Fax: + 90 312 447 51 95
Web page: http://www.era.org.tr/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Manaster, Steven & Mann, Steven C, 1996. "Life in the Pits: Competitive Market Making and Inventory Control," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 9(3), pages 953-75.
  2. Thierry Foucault & Ohad Kadan & Eugene Kandel, 2005. "Limit Order Book as a Market for Liquidity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 18(4), pages 1171-1217.
  3. Burton Hollifield & Robert Miller & Patrik Sandas, . "Empirical Analysis of Limit Order Markets," GSIA Working Papers -290183991, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  4. McInish, Thomas H & Wood, Robert A, 1992. " An Analysis of Intraday Patterns in Bid/Ask Spreads for NYSE Stocks," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 753-64, June.
  5. Peter R. Locke & P. C. Venkatesh, 1997. "Futures market transaction costs," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(2), pages 229-245, 04.
  6. Glosten, Lawrence R, 1994. " Is the Electronic Open Limit Order Book Inevitable?," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(4), pages 1127-61, September.
  7. Hee-Joon Ahn, 2001. "Limit Orders, Depth, and Volatility: Evidence from the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(2), pages 767-788, 04.
  8. Ferguson, Michael F & Mann, Steven C, 2001. "Execution Costs and Their Intraday Variation in Futures Markets," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74(1), pages 125-60, January.
  9. Biais, Bruno & Hillion, Pierre & Spatt, Chester, 1995. " An Empirical Analysis of the Limit Order Book and the Order Flow in the Paris Bourse," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(5), pages 1655-89, December.
  10. Stoll, Hans R, 1989. " Inferring the Components of the Bid-Ask Spread: Theory and Empirical Tests," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(1), pages 115-34, March.
  11. Bacidore, Jeffrey M., 1997. "The Impact of Decimalization on Market Quality: An Empirical Investigation of the Toronto Stock Exchange," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 92-120, April.
  12. repec:hal:journl:hal-00459769 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Alexander Kurov & Tatyana Zabotina, 2005. "Is it time to reduce the minimum tick sizes of the E‐mini futures?," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(1), pages 79-104, 01.
  14. Chang, Eric C. & Loche, Peter R., 1996. "The Performance and Market Impact of Dual Trading: CME Rule 552," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 23-48, January.
  15. Ronald L. Goettler & Christine A. Parlour & Uday Rajan, 2005. "Equilibrium in a Dynamic Limit Order Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(5), pages 2149-2192, October.
  16. Baesel, Jerome B & Shows, George & Thorp, Edward, 1983. " The Cost of Liquidity Services in Listed Options: A Note," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 38(3), pages 989-95, June.
  17. Handa, Puneet & Schwartz, Robert & Tiwari, Ashish, 2003. "Quote setting and price formation in an order driven market," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 461-489, August.
  18. Madhavan, Ananth & Porter, David & Weaver, Daniel, 2005. "Should securities markets be transparent?," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 265-287, August.
  19. Burton Hollifield & Robert Miller & Patrik Sandas & Joshua Slive, . "Liquidity Supply and Demand: Empirical Evidence from the Vancouver Stock Exchange," GSIA Working Papers 1999-E19, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
  20. Chung, Kee H. & Van Ness, Bonnie F. & Van Ness, Robert A., 1999. "Limit orders and the bid-ask spread," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(2), pages 255-287, August.
  21. Foucault, Thierry, 1999. "Order flow composition and trading costs in a dynamic limit order market1," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 2(2), pages 99-134, May.
  22. Haller, Andreas & Stoll, Hans R., 1989. "Market structure and transaction costs: Implied spreads in the German stock market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(4-5), pages 697-708, September.
  23. Tarun Chordia, 2001. "Market Liquidity and Trading Activity," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(2), pages 501-530, 04.
  24. Christopher L. Gilbert & Herbert A. Rijken, 2006. "How is Futures Trading Affected by the Move to a Computerized Trading System? Lessons from the LIFFE FTSE 100 Contract," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(7-8), pages 1267-1297.
  25. Ahn, Hee-Joon & Cao, Charles Q. & Choe, Hyuk, 1998. "Decimalization and competition among stock markets: Evidence from the Toronto Stock Exchange cross-listed securities," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 51-87, April.
  26. Fishman, Michael J & Longstaff, Francis A, 1992. " Dual Trading in Futures Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 643-71, June.
  27. Alexander Kurov, 2005. "Execution quality in open‐outcry futures markets," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(11), pages 1067-1092, November.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:erh:journl:v:2:y:2010:i:1:p:11-35. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (M. F. Cosar)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.