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Explaining the Performance Gap Between Public and Private School Students

  • Kevin C. Duncan


    (Colorado State University - Pueblo)

  • Jonathan Sandy

    (University of San Diego)

Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Labor Market Experience for Youth are used to estimate the private school test score advantage. Regression results indicate that those who attend private schools score higher on the Armed Forces Qualifications Test. However, this advantage loses statistical significance with controls for family and school background. Decomposition of the private-public test score difference indicates that 78 percent of the gap can be explained by differences in average characteristics. Broken down further, 45 percent of the gap is due to differences in family background and 26 percent is due to differences in school quality.

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Article provided by Eastern Economic Association in its journal Eastern Economic Journal.

Volume (Year): 33 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 (Spring)
Pages: 177-191

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Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:33:y:2007:i:2:p:177-191
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  10. O'Neill, June, 1990. "The Role of Human Capital in Earnings Differences between Black and White Men," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 4(4), pages 25-45, Fall.
  11. Barnard J. & Frangakis C.E. & Hill J.L. & Rubin D.B., 2003. "Principal Stratification Approach to Broken Randomized Experiments: A Case Study of School Choice Vouchers in New York City," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 98, pages 299-323, January.
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