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Does the National Health Service Corps Improve Physician Supply in Underserved Locations?

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  • George M. Holmes

    () (Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Abstract

The National Health Service Corps (NHSC) is a large federal program aimed at improving health care access in underserved locations. Prior evaluations have found that Corps enrollees have a higher probability of leaving the initial practice location than non-enrollees. The paper addresses two potential problems with these evaluations. We extend the classic measure of NHSC success, remaining in the initial location, to control for self-selection into the program. Second, the paper employs a broader metric for measuring the success of the Corps. If Corps participants practice in an underserved area, then the program has increased the access to primary health care.

Suggested Citation

  • George M. Holmes, 2004. "Does the National Health Service Corps Improve Physician Supply in Underserved Locations?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 563-581, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:eej:eeconj:v:30:y:2004:i:4:p:563-581
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    File URL: http://web.holycross.edu/RePEc/eej/Archive/Volume30/V30N4P563_581.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Instrumental Variables and the Search for Identification: From Supply and Demand to Natural Experiments," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 69-85, Fall.
    2. Denis Bolduc & Bernard Fortin & Stephen Gordon, 1997. "Multinomial Probit Estimation of Spatially Interdependent Choices: An Empirical Comparison of Two New Techniques," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 20(1-2), pages 77-101, April.
    3. Bolduc, Denis & Fortin, Bernard & Fournier, Marc-Andre, 1996. "The Effect of Incentive Policies on the Practice Location of Doctors: A Multinomial Probit Analysis," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 14(4), pages 703-732, October.
    4. Joseph P. Newhouse & Albert P. Williams & Bruce W. Bennett & William B. Schwartz, 1982. "Does the Geographical Distribution of Physicians Reflect Market Failure?," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 13(2), pages 493-505, Autumn.
    5. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
    6. Mroz, Thomas A, 1987. "The Sensitivity of an Empirical Model of Married Women's Hours of Work to Economic and Statistical Assumptions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(4), pages 765-799, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Till Bärnighausen & David E. Bloom, 2008. "Financial incentives for return of service in underserved areas: a systematic review," PGDA Working Papers 3608, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    2. Till Bärnighausen & David E. Bloom, 2008. "Designing financial-incentive programmes for return of medical service in underserved areas of sub-Saharan Africa," PGDA Working Papers 3708, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
    3. Till Bärnighausen & David E. Bloom, 2009. "Changing Research Perspectives on the Global Health Workforce," NBER Working Papers 15168, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Health Care; Health; Physician;

    JEL classification:

    • I11 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Analysis of Health Care Markets
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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