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Acting on Climate Finance Pledges: Inter-Agency Dynamics and Relationships with Aid in Contributor States

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  • Pickering, Jonathan
  • Skovgaard, Jakob
  • Kim, Soyeun
  • Roberts, J. Timmons
  • Rossati, David
  • Stadelmann, Martin
  • Reich, Hendrikje

Abstract

Developed countries have relied heavily on aid budgets to fulfill their pledges to boost funding for addressing climate change in developing countries. However, little is known about how interaction between aid and other ministries has shaped contributors’ diverse approaches to climate finance. This paper investigates intra-governmental dynamics in decision-making on climate finance in seven contributor countries (Australia, Denmark, Germany, Japan, Switzerland, the UK, and the US). While aid agencies retained considerable control over implementation, environment and finance ministries have played an influential and often contrasting role on key policy issues, including distribution between mitigation and adaptation and among geographical regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Pickering, Jonathan & Skovgaard, Jakob & Kim, Soyeun & Roberts, J. Timmons & Rossati, David & Stadelmann, Martin & Reich, Hendrikje, 2015. "Acting on Climate Finance Pledges: Inter-Agency Dynamics and Relationships with Aid in Contributor States," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 149-162.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:68:y:2015:i:c:p:149-162
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.10.033
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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Pickering & Frank Jotzo & Peter J. Wood, 2015. "Splitting the Difference: Can Limited Coordination Achieve a Fair Distribution of the Global Climate Financing Effort?," CCEP Working Papers 1504, Centre for Climate & Energy Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. Michelle Scobie, 0. "International aid, trade and investment and access and allocation," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 0, pages 1-16.
    3. Erik Lundsgaarde & Niels Keijzer, 2019. "Development Cooperation in a Multilevel and Multistakeholder Setting: From Planning towards Enabling Coordinated Action?," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 31(2), pages 215-234, April.
    4. Jonathan Pickering & Carola Betzold & Jakob Skovgaard, 2017. "Special issue: managing fragmentation and complexity in the emerging system of international climate finance," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 1-16, February.
    5. Alfonso Carfora & Monica Ronghi & Giuseppe Scandurra, 2017. "The effect of Climate Finance on Greenhouse Gas Emission: A Quantile Regression Approach," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 7(1), pages 185-199.
    6. Jakob Skovgaard, 2017. "Limiting costs or correcting market failures? Finance ministries and frame alignment in UN climate finance negotiations," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 89-106, February.
    7. Kissinger, Gabrielle & Gupta, Aarti & Mulder, Ivo & Unterstell, Natalie, 2019. "Climate financing needs in the land sector under the Paris Agreement: An assessment of developing country perspectives," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 256-269.
    8. Peterson, Lauri & Skovgaard, Jakob, 2019. "Bureaucratic politics and the allocation of climate finance," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 72-97.
    9. Michelle Scobie, 2020. "International aid, trade and investment and access and allocation," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 239-254, June.
    10. Jonathan Pickering & Paul Mitchell, 2017. "What drives national support for multilateral climate finance? International and domestic influences on Australia’s shifting stance," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 107-125, February.
    11. Renato Passaro & Ivana Quinto & Giuseppe Scandurra & Antonio Thomas, 2020. "How Do Energy Use and Climate Change Affect Fast-Start Finance? A Cross-Country Empirical Investigation," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(22), pages 1-23, November.
    12. Carfora, Alfonso & Scandurra, Giuseppe, 2019. "The impact of climate funds on economic growth and their role in substituting fossil energy sources," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 182-192.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate policy; climate finance; development assistance; bureaucratic politics;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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