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Opening Participatory Spaces for the Most Marginal: Learning from Collective Action in the Honduran Hillsides

  • Classen, Lauren
  • Humphries, Sally
  • FitzSimons, John
  • Kaaria, Susan
  • Jiménez, José
  • Sierra, Fredy
  • Gallardo, Omar
Registered author(s):

    Summary Community-driven development faces considerable criticism for excluding the poor. A series of participatory, qualitative, and quantitative assessments of a participatory agricultural initiative in rural Honduras shows that the project, once susceptible to elite capture, over time shifted to include the "most marginal." Participating farmers--both men and women--demonstrated significant improvements in well-being and new-found capabilities relative to non-participants. Opening a space for the most marginal was achieved through long-term commitment by a local NGO to the principle of inclusiveness, and to research and capability development beyond the guiding methodology for establishing local agricultural research committees (CIALs).

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 36 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 11 (November)
    Pages: 2402-2420

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:36:y:2008:i:11:p:2402-2420
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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