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Collective Action, Common Property, and Social Capital in South India: An Anthropological Commentary

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  • Mosse, David

Abstract

This article uses detailed research on common property and collective action in an ancient south Indian water resource system to highlight the different objectives, modes of analysis, explanation, and generalization of economists and anthropologists. The article does not try to resolve these differences but goes on to use the south Indian case to show how a recent attempt to deploy "social capital" as a unified socioeconomic concept--one that attends both to anthropologists' interest in social relationships and to economists' concern to identify central trends and general patterns through regressions by isolating "the social" as a variable generating aggregable data--is highly problematic.

Suggested Citation

  • Mosse, David, 2006. "Collective Action, Common Property, and Social Capital in South India: An Anthropological Commentary," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(3), pages 695-724, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2006:v:54:i:3:p:695-724
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/500034
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anthony Bebbington & Scott Guggenheim & Elizabeth Olson & Michael Woolcock, 2004. "Exploring Social Capital Debates at the World Bank," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(5), pages 33-64.
    2. Runge, Carlisle Ford, 1986. "Common property and collective action in economic development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 623-635, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Shaffer, Paul, 2013. "Ten Years of “Q-Squared”: Implications for Understanding and Explaining Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 269-285.
    2. Arun Agrawal & Nicolas Perrin & Ashwini Chhatre & Catherine Benson & Minna Kononen, 2009. "Climate Policy Processes, Local Institutions, and Adaptation Actions : Mechanisms of Translation and Influence," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11111, The World Bank.
    3. Classen, Lauren & Humphries, Sally & FitzSimons, John & Kaaria, Susan & Jiménez, José & Sierra, Fredy & Gallardo, Omar, 2008. "Opening Participatory Spaces for the Most Marginal: Learning from Collective Action in the Honduran Hillsides," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2402-2420, November.
    4. Ishihara, Hiroe & Pascual, Unai, 2009. "Social capital in community level environmental governance: A critique," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1549-1562, March.
    5. Akerkar, Supriya & Joshi, P.C. & Fordham, Maureen, 2016. "Cultures of Entitlement and Social Protection: Evidence from Flood Prone Bahraich, Uttar Pradesh, India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 46-58.

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