IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v46y2012i2p348-367.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Virtual reality simulation game approach to investigate transport adaptive capacity for peak oil planning

Author

Listed:
  • Watcharasukarn, Montira
  • Page, Shannon
  • Krumdieck, Susan

Abstract

The peak and decline of world oil production is an emerging issue for transportation and urban planners. Peak oil from an energy perspective means that there will be progressively less fuel. Our work treats changes in oil supply as a risk to transport activity systems. A virtual reality survey method, based on the sim game concept, has been developed to audit the participant’s normal weekly travel activity, and to explore participant’s travel adaptive capacity. The travel adaptive capacity assessment (TACA) Sim survey uses avatars, Google Map™, 2D scenes, interactive screens and feedback scores. Travel adaptive capacity is proposed as a measure of long-range resilience of activity systems to fuel supply decline. Mode adaptive potential is proposed as an indicator of the future demand growth for less energy intensive travel. Both adaptation indicators can be used for peak oil vulnerability assessment. A case study was conducted involving 90 participants in Christchurch New Zealand. All of the participants were students, general staff or academics at the University of Canterbury. The adaptive capacity was assessed by both simulated extreme fuel price shock and by asking, “do you have an alternative mode?” without price pressure. The travel adaptive capacity in number of kilometers was 75% under a 5-fold fuel price increase. The mode adaptive potential was 33% cycling, 21% walking and 22% bus. Academics had adaptive capacity of only 1–5% of trips by canceling or carrying out their activity from home compared to 10–18% for students.

Suggested Citation

  • Watcharasukarn, Montira & Page, Shannon & Krumdieck, Susan, 2012. "Virtual reality simulation game approach to investigate transport adaptive capacity for peak oil planning," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 348-367.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:348-367
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2011.10.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965856411001571
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Krumdieck, Susan & Page, Shannon & Dantas, André, 2010. "Urban form and long-term fuel supply decline: A method to investigate the peak oil risks to essential activities," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(5), pages 306-322, June.
    2. Sean Doherty & Eric Miller, 2000. "A computerized household activity scheduling survey," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 75-97, February.
    3. Sean Puckett & David Hensher & John Rose & Andrew Collins, 2007. "Design and development of a stated choice experiment for interdependent agents: accounting for interactions between buyers and sellers of urban freight services," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(4), pages 429-451, July.
    4. Kurani, Kenneth S & Turrentine, Tom & Sperling, Daniel, 1994. "Demand for electric vehicles in hybrid households: an exploratory analysis," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 1(4), pages 244-256, October.
    5. Höök, Mikael & Hirsch, Robert & Aleklett, Kjell, 2009. "Giant oil field decline rates and their influence on world oil production," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2262-2272, June.
    6. Bruno Faivre d'Arcier & Odile Andan & Charles Raux, 1998. "Stated adaptation surveys and choice process: Some methodological issues," Post-Print halshs-00139993, HAL.
    7. Kingham, S. & Dickinson, J. & Copsey, S, 2001. "Travelling to work: will people move out of their cars," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 151-160, April.
    8. Kurani, Kenneth S. & Turrentine, Tom & Sperling, Daniel, 1994. "Demand for Electric Vehicles in Hybrid Households: An Exploratory Analysis," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1c29r4hr, University of California Transportation Center.
    9. Zephyr, 2010. "The city," City, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1-2), pages 154-155, February.
    10. Aleklett, Kjell & Höök, Mikael & Jakobsson, Kristofer & Lardelli, Michael & Snowden, Simon & Söderbergh, Bengt, 2010. "The Peak of the Oil Age - Analyzing the world oil production Reference Scenario in World Energy Outlook 2008," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1398-1414, March.
    11. Lee, Ming-Sheng, 2001. "Experiments With A Computerized Self-Administrative Activity Survey," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt55h7r7x0, University of California Transportation Center.
    12. Handy, Susan & Weston, Lisa & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "Driving by choice or necessity?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 183-203.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Solaymani, Saeed & Kari, Fatimah, 2013. "Environmental and economic effects of high petroleum prices on transport sector," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 435-441.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:46:y:2012:i:2:p:348-367. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.