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Travelling to work: will people move out of their cars

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  • Kingham, S.
  • Dickinson, J.
  • Copsey, S

Abstract

This paper examines employee's perceptions of their modal choice during the journey to work, and addresses what factors influence modal choice, and whether people can be moved out of their cars to other more sustainable forms of transport. The results of surveys of the commuting habits of employees at two UK companies are presented and compared with other relevant studies. Ninety-seven and 88% of staff at the respective companies travel to work by car. While only 2 and 7% of respondents cycled to work, real potential for cycling was identified, given improvements in the cycling infrastructure. Similarly, while only 0 and 3% currently use public transport for the journey to work, improved services could see a significant modal shift. Overall, there seemed to be genuine willingness to move out of the car for the journey to work, with one of the main barriers being a perception that the alternatives are not viable. Additionally, it appears many people live too far from the workplace to cycle or use public transport.

Suggested Citation

  • Kingham, S. & Dickinson, J. & Copsey, S, 2001. "Travelling to work: will people move out of their cars," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 151-160, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:8:y:2001:i:2:p:151-160
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. D Banister, 1997. "Reducing the need to travel," Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 24(3), pages 437-449, May.
    7. Coleman, C., 2000. "Green commuter plans and the small employer: an investigation into the attitudes and policy of the small employer towards staff travel and green commuter plans," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 139-148, April.
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