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Public transport planning in a spatially segmented city: The case of Jerusalem

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  • Feitelson, Eran
  • Cohen-Blankshtain, Galit

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  • Feitelson, Eran & Cohen-Blankshtain, Galit, 2018. "Public transport planning in a spatially segmented city: The case of Jerusalem," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 65-74.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:107:y:2018:i:c:p:65-74
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2017.11.012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. E Feitelson, 1993. "An Hierarchical Approach to the Segmentation of Residential Demand: Theory and Application," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 25(4), pages 553-569, April.
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    5. Quadrifoglio, Luca & Dessouky, Maged M. & Ordóñez, Fernando, 2008. "A simulation study of demand responsive transit system design," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 718-737, May.
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    8. Abou-Zeid, Maya & Ben-Akiva, Moshe, 2012. "Travel mode switching: Comparison of findings from two public transportation experiments," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 48-59.
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    11. Cynthia Jacques & Kevin Manaugh & Ahmed El-Geneidy, 2013. "Rescuing the captive [mode] user: an alternative approach to transport market segmentation," Transportation, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 625-645, May.
    12. Hull, Angela, 2008. "Policy integration: What will it take to achieve more sustainable transport solutions in cities," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 94-103, March.
    13. Palmer, Kurt & Dessouky, Maged & Abdelmaguid, Tamer, 2004. "Impacts of management practices and advanced technologies on demand responsive transit systems," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 495-509, August.
    14. Feitelson, Eran & Salomon, Ilan, 2000. "The implications of differential network flexibility for spatial structures," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 459-479, August.
    15. Moshe Givoni & James Macmillen & David Banister & Eran Feitelson, 2013. "From Policy Measures to Policy Packages," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 1-20, January.
    16. Steg, Linda, 2005. "Car use: lust and must. Instrumental, symbolic and affective motives for car use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 147-162.
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