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What are the ingredients of successful travel behavioural change campaigns?

  • Davies, Nick
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    An examination of the evidence from twenty case studies of behavioural change projects identifies common and specific elements which led to their success. Using evidence from a recent EU project, the paper discusses the design of travel behaviour change campaigns, with specific reference to the theoretical underpinnings and practical approaches of social marketing. Important design elements include clear measureable aims, a combination of communications and face-to-face marketing approaches and formative research to build a holistic picture of the target audience and identify potential barriers to behavioural change. The varying nature of campaigns reflects a need to improve and synchronise evaluation, with particular focus on the actual design of the campaign.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0967070X12001114
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transport Policy.

    Volume (Year): 24 (2012)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 19-29

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:trapol:v:24:y:2012:i:c:p:19-29
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tranpol.2012.06.017
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    8. Elizabeth Shove, 2010. "Beyond the ABC: climate change policy and theories of social change," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 42(6), pages 1273-1285, June.
    9. Tertoolen, Gerard & van Kreveld, Dik & Verstraten, Ben, 1998. "Psychological resistance against attempts to reduce private car use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 171-181, April.
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