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ICT-specific technological change and economic growth in Korea

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  • Hwang, Won-Sik
  • Shin, Jungwoo

Abstract

This study investigates the role of information and communication technology-specific technological change in Korea's past and future. The contribution of information and communication technology (ICT) to past economic growth through embodied technology in intermediate inputs and investment goods is revealed by the growth accounting methodology, which considers quality adjustment. Relative prices between ICT-related products and other goods provide an indirect measure for identifying embodied technologies. Meanwhile, ICT's contribution to future economic growth is examined via policy simulations using the computable general equilibrium model. The results imply that ICT has grown Korea's economy and that policy measures for increasing ICT investment are required for continued sustainable growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Hwang, Won-Sik & Shin, Jungwoo, 2017. "ICT-specific technological change and economic growth in Korea," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 282-294.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:telpol:v:41:y:2017:i:4:p:282-294
    DOI: 10.1016/j.telpol.2016.12.006
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    Cited by:

    1. Kashif Iqbal & Hui Peng & Muhammad Hafeez & Khurshaid, 2020. "Analyzing the Effect of ICT on Migration and Economic Growth in Belt and Road (BRI) Countries," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 307-318, March.
    2. Gao, Yanyan & Zang, Leizhen & Sun, Jun, 2018. "Does computer penetration increase farmers’ income? An empirical study from China," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 42(5), pages 345-360.

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