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The productivity paradox and the new economy: The Spanish case

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  • Martínez, Diego
  • Rodríguez, Jesús
  • Torres, José L.

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of the information and communication technologies (ICT) on economic growth in Spain using a dynamic general equilibrium approach. Contrary to previous works, we use a production function with six different capital inputs, three of them corresponding to ICT assets. Calibration of the model suggests that the contribution of ICT to Spanish productivity growth is very relevant, whereas the contribution of non-ICT capital has been even negative. Additionally, over the sample period 1995-2002, we find a negative TFP growth and productivity growth. These results together aim at the hypothesis that the Spanish economy could be placed within the productivity paradox.

Suggested Citation

  • Martínez, Diego & Rodríguez, Jesús & Torres, José L., 2008. "The productivity paradox and the new economy: The Spanish case," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 1569-1586, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:30:y:2008:i:4:p:1569-1586
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    Cited by:

    1. Díaz, Antonia & Franjo, Luis, 2016. "Capital goods, measured TFP and growth: The case of Spain," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 19-39.
    2. José Luis Torres Chacon, 2015. "Introduction to Dynamic Macroeconomic General Equilibrium Models," Vernon Press Titles in Economics, Vernon Art and Science Inc, edition 2, number 54, December.
    3. Luis Sastre, 2016. "Exchange Rate, Cross Elasticities Between Exports and Imports and Current Account Sustainability: The Spanish Case," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 6, pages 32-46, November.
    4. Laura Hospido & Eva Moreno-Galbis, 2015. "The Spanish productivity puzzle in the Great Recession," Working Papers 1501, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    5. Jesus Lopez-Rodriguez & Diego Martinez, 2014. "Beyond the R&D effects on innovation: the contribution of non-R&D activities to TFP growth in the EU," Working Papers 2014/16, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    6. Ficawoyi Donou-Adonsou & Sokchea Lim & Samuel A. Mathey, 2016. "Technological Progress and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Telecommunications Infrastructure," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, pages 65-75.
    7. Manuel A. Hidalgo Pérez & Jesús Rodríguez López & José Mª O.Kean Alonso, 2008. "Labor demand and information technologies: evidence for Spain, 1980-2005," Economic Working Papers at Centro de Estudios Andaluces E2008/13, Centro de Estudios Andaluces.
    8. Lopez-Rodriguez, Jesus & Martinez-Lopez, Diego, 2017. "Looking beyond the R&D effects on innovation: The contribution of non-R&D activities to total factor productivity growth in the EU," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 37-45.
    9. Carmignani, Fabrizio & Mandeville, Thomas, 2014. "Never been industrialized: A tale of African structural change," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 124-137.
    10. Martínez, Diego & Rodríguez, Jesús & Torres, José L., 2010. "ICT-specific technological change and productivity growth in the US: 1980-2004," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 121-129, May.
    11. Rodríguez-López, Jesús & Torres, José L., 2012. "Technological Sources Of Productivity Growth In Germany, Japan, And The United States," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 16(01), pages 133-150, February.
    12. Diego Martínez & Jesús Rodríguez-López & José L. Torres, 2008. "Productivity growth and technological change in Europe and the U.S," Working Papers 2008-10, Universidad de Málaga, Department of Economic Theory, Málaga Economic Theory Research Center.
    13. F. J. Escribá-Pérez & M. J. Murgui-García & J. R. Ruiz-Tamarit, 2017. "Economic and Statistical Measurement of Physical Capital with an Application to the Spanish Economy," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2017020, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    14. Mostafa SALIMIFAR & Mehdi BEHNAME, 2013. "Information Technology And Productivity Growth In Islamic Countries," Romanian Journal of Economics, Institute of National Economy, vol. 36(1(45)), pages 128-135, June.
    15. José Luis Torres Chacon, 2015. "Introduction to Dynamic Macroeconomic General Equilibrium Models [Second Edition, Paperback]," Vernon Press Titles in Economics, Vernon Art and Science Inc, edition 2, number 44.
    16. Vu, Khuong M., 2013. "Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Singapore’s economic growth," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 284-300.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    New economy Information and communication technologies Technological change Productivity paradox;

    JEL classification:

    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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