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ICT and productivity in Europe and the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Ark, Bart van
  • Inklaar, Robert
  • McGuckin, Robert H.

    (Groningen University)

Abstract

The surge in labour productivity growth in the United States in the late 1990s has prompted much speculation about the capacity of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) to structurally increase growth. The simultaneous slowdown in productivity growth in the EU suggests the European countries are falling behind. In this paper we will analyse labour productivity growth in 51 industries in Europe and the United States. Using shift-share techniques we identify the industries in which the U.S. has gained a lead and the underlying reasons for this. The results show that the U.S. has grown faster than the EU because of a larger ICT producing sector and faster growth in services industries that make intensive use of ICT. Lagging growth in Europe is concentrated in wholesale and retail trade and the securities industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Ark, Bart van & Inklaar, Robert & McGuckin, Robert H., 2003. "ICT and productivity in Europe and the United States," CCSO Working Papers 200311, University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:gro:rugccs:200311
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    File URL: http://irs.ub.rug.nl/ppn/253178177
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    Cited by:

    1. Marina Rybalka, 2015. "The innovative input mix. Assessing the importance of R&D and ICT investments for firm performance in manufacturing and services," Discussion Papers 801, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Bart van Ark & Robert Inklaar & Robert H. McGuckin, 2003. "ICT and Productivity in Europe and the United States Where Do the Differences Come From?," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 49(3), pages 295-318.
    3. Federico Biagi & Maria Laura Parisi & Lucia Vergano, 2008. "Organizational Innovations and Labor Productivity in a Panel of Italian Manufacturing Firms," Working Papers 0813, University of Brescia, Department of Economics.
    4. Dimelis, Sophia P. & Papaioannou, Sotiris K., 2011. "ICT growth effects at the industry level: A comparison between the US and the EU," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 37-50, March.
    5. Henry van der Wiel & George van Leeuwen, 2003. "Do ICT spillovers matter; evidence from Dutch firm-level data," CPB Discussion Paper 26, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    6. Indjikian, Rouben & Siegel, Donald S., 2005. "The Impact of Investment in IT on Economic Performance: Implications for Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 681-700, May.
    7. Kaitila, Ville, 2006. "Productivity, Hours Worked, and Tax/Benefit Systems in Europe and Beyond," Discussion Papers 1015, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    8. FUKAO Kyoji & MIYAGAWA Tsutomu, 2007. "Productivity in Japan, the US, and the Major EU Economies: Is Japan Falling Behind?," Discussion papers 07046, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    9. Łukasz Arendt, 2016. "Paradoks Solowa i determinanty wdrożenia technologii informacyjnych i telekomunikacyjnych," Gospodarka Narodowa, Warsaw School of Economics, issue 1, pages 29-53.
    10. Erik van der Marel, 2012. "Trade in Services and TFP: The Role of Regulation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(11), pages 1530-1558, November.
    11. Theo Eicher & Thomas Strobel, 2008. "Germany’s Continued Productivity Slump: An Industry Analysis," ifo Working Paper Series 58, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    12. Juan F. Jimeno & Esther Moral & Lorena Saiz, 2006. "Structural breaks in labor productivity growth: the United States vs. the European Union," Working Papers 0625, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    13. Wilhelm Kohler, 2006. "The “Lisbon Goal” of the EU: Rhetoric or Substance?," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 85-113, June.
    14. Ernest Gnan & Jürgen Janger & Johann Scharler, 2004. "Determinants of Long-Term Growth in Austria – A Call for a National Growth Strategy," Monetary Policy & the Economy, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 23-46.

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