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Structural and climatic change

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  • Engström, Gustav

Abstract

This paper studies a multi-sector growth model where emissions from fossil fuels give rise to a climate externality. Each sector is impacted heterogeneously by climate change which together with technological differences induces factor reallocation over time. By solving the social planners problem and characterizing the competitive equilibrium this paper derives a simple formula for optimal taxes and sectoral factor allocation which shows how the elasticity of substitution between sectors impact on taxes through differences in technology as well as sensitivity to climate change. I also present separate numerical simulations for how optimal policies differ depending on sectoral composition, exemplified by the U.S and Indian economy. The results show how climate change,Please check the telephone number and the email address of the corresponding author, and correct if necessary. technological development and the elasticity of substitution can impact on optimal fossil fuel consumption over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Engström, Gustav, 2016. "Structural and climatic change," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 62-74.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:37:y:2016:i:c:p:62-74
    DOI: 10.1016/j.strueco.2015.11.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Structural change; Climate change; Economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O44 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Environment and Growth

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