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Pay-what-you-want or mark-off-your-own-price – A framing effect in customer-selected pricing

Author

Listed:
  • Schröder, Marina
  • Lüer, Annemarie
  • Sadrieh, Abdolkarim

Abstract

We conduct a natural field experiment to test for the effect of framing on prices paid in two customer-selected price mechanisms. In two framing conditions, we sell a soft drink and provide customers with a reference price for this drink. In the pay-what-you-want (PWYW) condition, customers are told that they can pay much as they want. In the mark-off-your-own-price (MOYOP) condition, customers are told that they can reduce the price by as much as they want. We find that prices are significantly lower and that more customers choose a price of zero in the MOYOP compared to the PWYW condition. We conjecture that the explicit request to reduce the price in MOYOP is a strong signal for customers to adjust their perception of the appropriate price downwards.

Suggested Citation

  • Schröder, Marina & Lüer, Annemarie & Sadrieh, Abdolkarim, 2015. "Pay-what-you-want or mark-off-your-own-price – A framing effect in customer-selected pricing," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 200-204.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:57:y:2015:i:c:p:200-204
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socec.2014.10.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gerpott, Torsten J. & Schneider, Christina, 2016. "Buying behaviors when similar products are available under pay-what-you-want and posted price conditions: Field-experimental evidence," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 135-145.
    2. Gravert, Christina, 2017. "Pride and patronage - pay-what-you-want pricing at a charitable bookstore," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 1-7.
    3. Spann, Martin & Stich, Lucas & Schmidt, Klaus M., 2017. "Pay What You Want as a Pricing Model for Open Access Publishing?," Rationality and Competition Discussion Paper Series 10, CRC TRR 190 Rationality and Competition.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Participative pricing; Voluntary payment mechanism; Framing; Field experiment;

    JEL classification:

    • D47 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Market Design
    • M31 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Marketing and Advertising - - - Marketing
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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