IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Financial markets and economic performances: Empirical evidence from five industrialized economies

Listed author(s):
  • Colombage, Sisira R.N.
Registered author(s):

    This paper investigates the nature of the links between the development of financial markets and economic performances in five advanced economies. The vector error correction model (VECM) establishes the quantitative importance of long-run relationships among three financial variables and the real output. Granger's causality test then suggests short-run causality between financial markets and the real sector as well as the substitution effect of the individual sectors in the financial market of each country. The results support the supply-leading hypothesis that the development of financial markets spurs growth for all countries except for Canada. The demand-driven hypothesis is confirmed for Canada only in the short run.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0275-5319(08)00060-3
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research in International Business and Finance.

    Volume (Year): 23 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 339-348

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:riibaf:v:23:y:2009:i:3:p:339-348
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ribaf

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as
    in new window


    1. John Y. Campbell, 2001. "Have Individual Stocks Become More Volatile? An Empirical Exploration of Idiosyncratic Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(1), pages 1-43, 02.
    2. Keith Blackburn & Niloy Bose & Salvatore Capasso, 2003. "Financial Development, Financing Choice and Economic Growth," CSEF Working Papers 96, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    3. Schwert, G.W., 1988. "Business Cycles, Financial Crises And Stock Volatility," Papers 88-06, Rochester, Business - General.
    4. Johansen, S., 1991. "Determination of Cointegration Rank in the Presence of a Linear Trend," Papers 76a, Helsinki - Department of Economics.
    5. Peter L. Rousseau & Paul Wachtel, 2005. "Economic Growth and Financial Depth: Is the Relationship Extinct Already?," Working Papers 05-15, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    6. King, Robert G.*Levine, Ross, 1993. "Finance and growth : Schumpeter might be right," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1083, The World Bank.
    7. Ross Levine & Sara Zervos, "undated". "Stock markets, banks and economic growth ," CERF Discussion Paper Series 95-11, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
    8. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    9. Fischer, Stanley & Merton, Robert C., 1984. "Macroeconomics and finance: The role of the stock market," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 57-108, January.
    10. Alif Darrat, 1999. "Are Financial Deepening and Economic Growth Causally Related? Another Look at the Evidence," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 19-35.
    11. Robert J. Barro, 1989. "The Stock Market and Investment," NBER Working Papers 2925, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Levine, Ross & Loayza, Norman & Beck, Thorsten, 2000. "Financial intermediation and growth: Causality and causes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 31-77, August.
    13. Fama, Eugene F, 1981. "Stock Returns, Real Activity, Inflation, and Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 71(4), pages 545-565, September.
    14. Douglas W. Diamond, 1994. "Corporate capital structure: the control roles of bank and public debt with taxes and costly bankruptcy," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Spr, pages 11-37.
    15. Osterwald-Lenum, Michael, 1992. "A Note with Quantiles of the Asymptotic Distribution of the Maximum Likelihood Cointegration Rank Test Statistics," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(3), pages 461-472, August.
    16. Bencivenga, V.R. & Smith, B.D., 1988. "Some Consequences Of Credit Rationing In An Endogenous Growth Model," RCER Working Papers 159, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    17. Capasso, Salvatore, 2006. "Stock Market Development and Economic Growth," WIDER Working Paper Series 102, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    18. Milton Friedman & Anna J. Schwartz, 1963. "A Monetary History of the United States, 1867–1960," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number frie63-1, April.
    19. Patrick Bolton & Xavier Freixas, 2000. "Equity, Bonds, and Bank Debt: Capital Structure and Financial Market Equilibrium under Asymmetric Information," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(2), pages 324-351, April.
    20. Peter L. Rousseau & Paul Wachtel, 1998. "Equity Markets and Growth: Cross-Country Evidence on Timing and Outcomes, 1980-1995," Working Papers 98-09, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
    21. William Schwert, G., 1989. "Business cycles, financial crises, and stock volatility : Reply to Shiller," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 133-137, January.
    22. Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Levine, Ross, 1999. "Bank-based and market-based financial systems - cross-country comparisons," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2143, The World Bank.
    23. Hendry, David F., 1995. "Dynamic Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198283164.
    24. Jonathan Batten & Peter Szilagyi, 2003. "Why Japan Needs to Develop its Corporate Bond Market," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 83-108.
    25. Johansen, Soren, 1991. "Estimation and Hypothesis Testing of Cointegration Vectors in Gaussian Vector Autoregressive Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(6), pages 1551-1580, November.
    26. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:riibaf:v:23:y:2009:i:3:p:339-348. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.