IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/retrec/v25y2009i1p8-18.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Induced travel demand: Evidence from a pseudo panel data based structural equations model

Author

Listed:
  • Weis, Claude
  • Axhausen, Kay W.

Abstract

Induced traffic, defined as additional demand generated by improvements in travel conditions, has been a topic of research for many years. While previous studies have focused on specific and localised changes, the research described in this paper deals with the aggregate effects of changed generalised costs of travel on traffic generation: the propensity of participating in out-of-home activities on a given day, the number of trips and journeys conducted, and the resulting total times out-of-home and distances travelled. The generalised cost and accessibility elasticities estimated with a structural equations model for a pseudo panel constructed with the Swiss National Travel surveys since 1974 are surprisingly substantial even after correcting for age, cohort and other socio-demographic effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Weis, Claude & Axhausen, Kay W., 2009. "Induced travel demand: Evidence from a pseudo panel data based structural equations model," Research in Transportation Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 8-18.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:retrec:v:25:y:2009:i:1:p:8-18
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0739-8859(09)00032-8
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Cao, Xinyu, 2008. "Examining the impacts of residential self-selection on travel behavior: A focus on methodologies," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 204-228, March.
    2. Dargay, Joyce M., 2002. "Determinants of car ownership in rural and urban areas: a pseudo-panel analysis," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(5), pages 351-366, September.
    3. Robert Cervero & Mark Hansen, 2002. "Induced Travel Demand and Induced Road Investment: A Simultaneous Equation Analysis," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 36(3), pages 469-490, September.
    4. Lu, Xuedong & Pas, Eric I., 1999. "Socio-demographics, activity participation and travel behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 1-18, January.
    5. Fogel,Robert William, 2004. "The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700–2100," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521004886, December.
    6. Fogel,Robert William, 2004. "The Escape from Hunger and Premature Death, 1700–2100," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521808781, December.
    7. Huang, Biao, 2007. "The Use of Pseudo Panel Data for Forecasting Car Ownership," MPRA Paper 7086, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Golob, Thomas F., 2003. "Structural equation modeling for travel behavior research," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-25, January.
    9. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Chen, Cynthia, 2004. "TTB or not TTB, that is the question: a review and analysis of the empirical literature on travel time (and money) budgets," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 38(9-10), pages 643-675.
    10. Goulias, Konstadinos G & Blain, Larry & Kilgren, Neil & Michalowski, Timothy & Murakami, Elaine, 2007. "Catching the Next Big Wave: Are the Observed Behavioral Dynamics of the Baby Boomers Forcing Us to Rethink Regional Travel Demand Models?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9f83x03p, University of California Transportation Center.
    11. Noland, Robert B., 2001. "Relationships between highway capacity and induced vehicle travel," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 47-72, January.
    12. Arun Kuppam & Ram Pendyala, 2001. "A structural equations analysis of commuters' activity and travel patterns," Transportation, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 33-54, February.
    13. Yee, Julie L. & Niemeier, Debbie A., 2000. "Analysis of activity duration using the Puget sound transportation panel," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 607-624, November.
    14. Dargay, Joyce, 2007. "The effect of prices and income on car travel in the UK," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(10), pages 949-960, December.
    15. Jean-Loup Madre & Kay Axhausen & Werner Brög, 2007. "Immobility in travel diary surveys," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 107-128, January.
    16. Patrick DeCorla-Souza & Harry Cohen, 1999. "Estimating induced travel for evaluation of metropolitan highway expansion," Transportation, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 249-262, August.
    17. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
    18. Ajay Kumar & David Levinson, 1994. "Specifying, Estimating and Validating a New Trip Generation Model: Case Study in Montgomery County, Maryland," Working Papers 199401, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
    19. Frank Primerano & Michael Taylor & Ladda Pitaksringkarn & Peter Tisato, 2008. "Defining and understanding trip chaining behaviour," Transportation, Springer, vol. 35(1), pages 55-72, January.
    20. Robert Noland & William Cowart, 2000. "Analysis of Metropolitan Highway Capacity and the growth in vehicle miles of travel," Transportation, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 363-390, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chi-Hong (Patrick) Tsai & Corinne Mulley & Geoffrey Clifton, 2014. "A Review of Pseudo Panel Data Approach in Estimating Short-run and Long-run Public Transport Demand Elasticities," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1), pages 102-121, January.
    2. repec:eee:jotrge:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:139-149 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Susilo, Yusak & Liu, Chengxi & Börjesson, Maria, 2018. "The changes of activity-travel participation across gender, life-cycle, and generations in Sweden over 30 years," Working papers in Transport Economics 2018:8, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
    4. Jahanshahi, Kaveh & Jin, Ying & Williams, Ian, 2015. "Direct and indirect influences on employed adults’ travel in the UK: New insights from the National Travel Survey data 2002–2010," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 288-306.
    5. repec:eee:jotrge:v:72:y:2018:i:c:p:228-236 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:retrec:v:25:y:2009:i:1:p:8-18. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/620614/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.