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The barriers and institutional arrangements of the implementation of renewable portfolio standard: A perspective of China

  • Xin-gang, Zhao
  • Tian-tian, Feng
  • Lu, Cui
  • Xia, Feng
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    Compared to the Feed-in tariff in China, the Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) could not only help to change the driving force of renewable energy industry development, but also provide the renewable energy industry with incentives to achieve the governments' planned goal. This paper first compares the features of RPS of the major industrialized countries. Second the barriers of implementing the Renewable Portfolio Standard in China are analyzed from five aspects. Finally, based on the above analysis, this paper puts forward relative institutional arrangements for the implementation of Renewable Portfolio Standard in China making recommendations for the development of renewable energy industry.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2014)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 371-380

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:30:y:2014:i:c:p:371-380
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