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A regulatory adjustment process for the determination of the optimal percentage requirement in an electricity market with Tradable Green Certificates

  • Currier, Kevin M.
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    A system of Tradable Green Certificates (TGCs) is a market-based subsidy scheme designed to promote electricity generation from renewable energy sources such as wind power. Under a TGC system, the principal policy instrument is the “percentage requirement,” which stipulates the percentage of total electricity production (“green” plus “black”) that must be obtained from renewable sources. In this paper, we propose a regulatory adjustment process that a regulator can employ to determine the socially optimal percentage requirement, explicitly accounting for environmental damages resulting from black electricity generation.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 62 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 1053-1057

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:62:y:2013:i:c:p:1053-1057
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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    1. Christoph Böhringer & Henrike Koschel & Ulf Moslener, 2008. "Efficiency losses from overlapping regulation of EU carbon emissions," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 33(3), pages 299-317, June.
    2. Toke, David, 2008. "The EU Renewables Directive--What is the fuss about trading?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2991-2998, August.
    3. Bergek, Anna & Jacobsson, Staffan, 2010. "Are tradable green certificates a cost-efficient policy driving technical change or a rent-generating machine? Lessons from Sweden 2003-2008," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 1255-1271, March.
    4. Amundsen, E.S. & Mortensen, J.B., 2001. "The Danish Green Certificate System: Some Simple Analytical Results," Norway; Department of Economics, University of Bergen 226, Department of Economics, University of Bergen.
    5. Amundsen, Eirik S. & Baldursson, Fridrik M. & Mortensen, Jørgen Birk, 2003. "Price Volatility and Banking in Green Certificate Markets," Working Papers in Economics 02/03, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    6. Nielsen, Lene & Jeppesen, Tim, 2003. "Tradable Green Certificates in selected European countries--overview and assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 3-14, January.
    7. Currier, Kevin M., 1988. "An application of cremer's planning procedure to the optimal commodity taxation problem," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 123-127.
    8. Christoph Böhringer & Knut Rosendahl, 2010. "Green promotes the dirtiest: on the interaction between black and green quotas in energy markets," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 316-325, June.
    9. Tamás, Mészáros Mátyás & Bade Shrestha, S.O. & Zhou, Huizhong, 2010. "Feed-in tariff and tradable green certificate in oligopoly," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4040-4047, August.
    10. Ford, Andrew & Vogstad, Klaus & Flynn, Hilary, 2007. "Simulating price patterns for tradable green certificates to promote electricity generation from wind," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 91-111, January.
    11. Amundsen, Eirik S. & Nese, Gjermund, 2009. "Integration of tradable green certificate markets: What can be expected?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 903-922, November.
    12. Zhou, Huizhong & Tamas, Meszaros Matyas, 2010. "Impacts of integration of production of black and green energy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 220-226, January.
    13. Amundsen, Eirik S. & Mortensen, Jorgen Birk, 2001. "The Danish Green Certificate System: some simple analytical results," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 489-509, September.
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