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Comparative assessment of road transport technologies

Author

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  • Streimikiene, Dalia
  • Baležentis, Tomas
  • Baležentienė, Ligita

Abstract

The aim of the paper is to assess energy technologies in road transport sector in terms of atmospheric emissions and costs and to indicate the most competitive and environmentally friendly transport technologies. The main tasks of the paper are: to develop the multi-criteria framework for comparative assessment of energy technologies in road transport and to apply MCDM methods for the transport technologies assessment. One of the MCDM methods, viz. the interval TOPSIS method, is employed in order to tackle the uncertain criteria. The assessment framework allows comparing road transport technologies in terms of their environmental and economic impacts and facilitates decision making process in transport sector. The main indicators selected for technologies assessment are: private costs and life cycle emissions of the main pollutants (GHG; particulates, NOx, CO, HCs). The ranking of road transport technologies based on private costs and atmospheric emissions allowed prioritizing these technologies in terms of environmental friendliness the lowest costs. However the extent, capacity, and quality of road infrastructure affects the overall level of transportation activity, which in turn affects how much energy is consumed by vehicles and the amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted. The paper presents the impact of transportation infrastructure on GHG emissions from road vehicles and policy implications of performed assessment.

Suggested Citation

  • Streimikiene, Dalia & Baležentis, Tomas & Baležentienė, Ligita, 2013. "Comparative assessment of road transport technologies," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 611-618.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:20:y:2013:i:c:p:611-618
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2012.12.021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Faria, Ricardo & Marques, Pedro & Moura, Pedro & Freire, Fausto & Delgado, Joaquim & de Almeida, Aníbal T., 2013. "Impact of the electricity mix and use profile in the life-cycle assessment of electric vehicles," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 271-287.
    2. repec:eee:enepol:v:107:y:2017:i:c:p:167-181 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Kumar, Lalit & Jain, Shailendra, 2014. "Electric propulsion system for electric vehicular technology: A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 924-940.
    4. Yilmaz, Murat, 2015. "Limitations/capabilities of electric machine technologies and modeling approaches for electric motor design and analysis in plug-in electric vehicle applications," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 80-99.
    5. Shi, Qian & Yu, Tao & Zuo, Jian, 2015. "What leads to low-carbon buildings? A China study," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 726-734.
    6. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2017:i:1:p:14-:d:123944 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Raslavičius, Laurencas & Keršys, Artūras & Mockus, Saulius & Keršienė, Neringa & Starevičius, Martynas, 2014. "Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as a medium-term option in the transition to sustainable fuels and transport," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 513-525.
    8. Sehatpour, Mohammad-Hadi & Kazemi, Aliyeh & Sehatpour, Hesam-eddin, 2017. "Evaluation of alternative fuels for light-duty vehicles in Iran using a multi-criteria approach," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 295-310.
    9. AlSabbagh, Maha & Siu, Yim Ling & Guehnemann, Astrid & Barrett, John, 2017. "Integrated approach to the assessment of CO2e-mitigation measures for the road passenger transport sector in Bahrain," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 203-215.
    10. Mardani, Abbas & Zavadskas, Edmundas Kazimieras & Khalifah, Zainab & Zakuan, Norhayati & Jusoh, Ahmad & Nor, Khalil Md & Khoshnoudi, Masoumeh, 2017. "A review of multi-criteria decision-making applications to solve energy management problems: Two decades from 1995 to 2015," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 216-256.
    11. Khan, Muhammad Imran & Yasmin, Tabassum & Shakoor, Abdul, 2015. "Technical overview of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a transportation fuel," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 785-797.

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