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Household's coping strategies and recoveries from shocks in Vietnam

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  • Tran, Van Q.

Abstract

There has been a great deal of the literature on the effects of shocks on a household's well-being as well as on the choice of ex-ante and ex-post strategies in the context of risk exposure. However, researchers have paid little attention to the ability of a household to recover from an adverse event. Additionally, the livelihood of those in the developing world has been increasingly affected by macroeconomic instabilities and extreme weather conditions. This study aims to investigate the forces that shape a household's recovery from misfortune. The analyses are applied to the case of Vietnam by using data collected from household surveys from years 2007 to 2010 and a discrete time proportional hazard model to find the determinants of the shock recovery. The results show that a household's characteristics do not strongly determine the shock recovery but physical assets do. Shocks covariates such as more losses and higher severity make the misfortune harder to recover from. Additionally, coping strategies sometimes help poor households recover better from the losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Tran, Van Q., 2015. "Household's coping strategies and recoveries from shocks in Vietnam," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 15-29.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:56:y:2015:i:c:p:15-29
    DOI: 10.1016/j.qref.2014.06.006
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eme:reinzz:s1049-258520150000023008 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Van Q. Tran & Sabina Alkire & Stephan Klasen, 2015. "Static and Dynamic Disparities between Monetary and Multidimensional Poverty Measurement: Evidence from Vietnam," Research on Economic Inequality,in: Measurement of Poverty, Deprivation, and Economic Mobility, volume 23, pages 249-281 Emerald Publishing Ltd.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Household assets; Shocks; Coping strategies; Duration of recovery; Vietnam;

    JEL classification:

    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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