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General-equilibrium effects of investment tax incentives

Author

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  • Edge, Rochelle M.
  • Rudd, Jeremy B.

Abstract

A new-Keynesian model with a nominal tax system is developed and used to study the macroeconomic effects of temporary tax-based investment incentives. Two claims regarding the effects of these incentives are examined: first that they are overstated in partial-equilibrium frameworks; and second that repeated use of such incentives by policymakers can ultimately be destabilizing. The results contradict the first claim and imply that the second claim is not general. The model is also used to compute the predicted effects of an investment tax incentive that has figured prominently in recent fiscal stimulus packages.

Suggested Citation

  • Edge, Rochelle M. & Rudd, Jeremy B., 2011. "General-equilibrium effects of investment tax incentives," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(6), pages 564-577.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:58:y:2011:i:6:p:564-577
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmoneco.2011.10.007
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    Cited by:

    1. Julio Carrillo & Celine Poilly, 2013. "How do financial frictions affect the spending multiplier during a liquidity trap?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 16(2), pages 296-311, April.
    2. Pérez-Orive, Ander, 2016. "Credit constraints, firms׳ precautionary investment, and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 112-131.
    3. Julio A. CARRILLO & Celine POILLY, 2010. "On the Recovery Path during a Liquidity Trap: Do Financial Frictions Matter for Fiscal Multipliers?," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2010034, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

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