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Price reform and household demand for electricity

Author

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  • Carter, Adrian
  • Craigwell, Roland
  • Moore, Winston

Abstract

This paper uses an estimated model of residential electricity demand to examine the impact of proposed tariff changes on a representative sample of 130 Barbadian households. The estimated equation results suggest that the price elasticities of demand for particular appliances varied significantly, with households that utilise solar water heating being more price elastic than households that utilise air conditioning and electric water heating. The income effects were, however, statistically insignificant, as they may have been captured by choices of appliances rather than utilisation. The estimated model results were then employed to examine the effect of a proposed change in the tariff structure for electricity in Barbados. The simulated results seem to indicate that changes in the electricity rate structure are likely to have very little impact on households demand for electricity. However, changes in consumption patterns could occur within upper consumption and upper income households.

Suggested Citation

  • Carter, Adrian & Craigwell, Roland & Moore, Winston, 2012. "Price reform and household demand for electricity," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 242-252.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:34:y:2012:i:2:p:242-252
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jpolmod.2011.08.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Damette, Olivier & Delacote, Philippe & Lo, Gaye Del, 2018. "Households energy consumption and transition toward cleaner energy sources," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 751-764.
    2. Winston Moore & Mika Korkeakoski & Jyrki Luukkanen & Laron Alleyne & Abdullahi Abdulkadri & Noel Brown & Therese Chambers & Orlando Costa & Alecia Evans & Sidonia McKenzie & Dwight Reid & Luis Vazquez, 2016. "Modelling Long-Run Energy Development Plans: The Case of Barbados," EcoMod2016 9403, EcoMod.
    3. repec:eee:rensus:v:80:y:2017:i:c:p:505-518 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ohler, Adrienne M. & Billger, Sherrilyn M., 2014. "Does environmental concern change the tragedy of the commons? Factors affecting energy saving behaviors and electricity usage," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 1-12.
    5. Youn, Hyungho & Jin, Hyun Joung, 2016. "The effects of progressive pricing on household electricity use," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1078-1088.
    6. Jones, Rory V. & Fuertes, Alba & Lomas, Kevin J., 2015. "The socio-economic, dwelling and appliance related factors affecting electricity consumption in domestic buildings," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 901-917.
    7. Çetinkaya, Murat & Başaran, Alparslan A. & Bağdadioğlu, Necmiddin, 2015. "Electricity reform, tariff and household elasticity in Turkey," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 79-85.
    8. Moore, Alvon, 2011. "Demand elasticity of oil in Barbados," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3515-3519, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Electricity demand; Heckman estimator; Developing country;

    JEL classification:

    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • C24 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Truncated and Censored Models; Switching Regression Models; Threshold Regression Models
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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