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Household electricity and gas consumption for heating homes

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  • Jeong, Jaehoon
  • Seob Kim, Chang
  • Lee, Jongsu

Abstract

Energy consumption has been drastically changed because of energy source depletion, price fluctuations, development and penetration of alternative energy sources, and government policies. Household energy sources are interrelated, and energy price and household characteristics, such as income level and dwelling size, affect the usage. To supply energy consistently and achieve a balance between production and consumption, stakeholders must understand consumer energy-consumption behavior. Therefore, this study identifies household heating energy usage patterns and the substitutive and/or complementary relationships between electricity and gas. Based on a multiple discrete-continuous extreme value model, household utility structure is identified from data on gas-heating usage. Results show greater utility and the smallest satiation values for gas boilers than for electric heaters and electric heating beds. The effects of consumer socioeconomic and environmental characteristics on the choice of heating energy sources were analyzed. Also, for further comparison, the respondents were split into high and low categories for income, heating degree days, dwelling size, and gas usage. Gas was found to be the most economical heating choice for households.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeong, Jaehoon & Seob Kim, Chang & Lee, Jongsu, 2011. "Household electricity and gas consumption for heating homes," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 2679-2687, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:39:y:2011:i:5:p:2679-2687
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gobong Choi & Eunnyeong Heo & Chul-Yong Lee, 2018. "Dynamic Economic Analysis of Subsidies for New and Renewable Energy in South Korea," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(6), pages 1-19, June.
    2. Tovar, Miguel A., 2012. "The structure of energy efficiency investment in the UK households and its average monetary and environmental savings," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 723-735.
    3. Enam, Annesha & Konduri, Karthik C. & Pinjari, Abdul R. & Eluru, Naveen, 2018. "An integrated choice and latent variable model for multiple discrete continuous choice kernels: Application exploring the association between day level moods and discretionary activity engagement choi," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 80-100.
    4. Acharya, Bikram & Marhold, Klaus, 2019. "Determinants of household energy use and fuel switching behavior in Nepal," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 1132-1138.
    5. Castro, Marisol & Bhat, Chandra R. & Pendyala, Ram M. & Jara-Díaz, Sergio R., 2012. "Accommodating multiple constraints in the multiple discrete–continuous extreme value (MDCEV) choice model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 46(6), pages 729-743.
    6. Marius Claudy and Claus Michelsen, 2016. "Housing Market Fundamentals, Housing Quality and Energy Consumption: Evidence from Germany," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 4).
    7. Frontuto, Vito, 2019. "Forecasting household consumption of fuels: A multiple discrete-continuous approach," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 240(C), pages 205-214.

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