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Trade liberalisation and household welfare in Nepal

  • Acharya, Sanjaya
  • Cohen, Solomon

We examine some of the most recent works on general equilibrium models that measured the impact of trade liberalisation on household welfare. We modify the standard neo-classical model and apply it to a typical South Asian village economy which is still lagging in studies of policy modelling. We conclude that the combination of import and export liberalisations generates higher growth but the distribution pattern does not become pro-poor. Liberalisation under a flexible exchange rate regime when compared to the fixed regime can work negatively since the currency may appreciate much and eliminate the comparative advantages. We also find that a piece by piece external reform gives better economic results than implementing all external reforms together.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Policy Modeling.

Volume (Year): 30 (2008)
Issue (Month): 6 ()
Pages: 1057-1060

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jpolmo:v:30:y:2008:i:6:p:1057-1060
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505735

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  1. Dorothée Boccanfuso & Luc Savard, 2005. "Impact Analysis of the Liberalization of Groundnut Production in Senegal: A Multi-household Computable General Equilibrium Model," Cahiers de recherche 05-12, Departement d'Economique de la Faculte d'administration à l'Universite de Sherbrooke.
  2. Margaret Chitiga & Tonia Kandiero & Ramos Mabugu, 2005. "Computable General Equilibrium Micro-Simulation Analysis of the Impact of Trade Policies on Poverty in Zimbabwe," Working Papers MPIA 2005-01, PEP-MPIA.
  3. Field, Alfred J. & Wongwatanasin, Umaporn, 2007. "Tax policies' impact on output, trade and income in Thailand," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 361-380.
  4. Naude, Willem & Coetzee, Rian, 2004. "Globalisation and inequality in South Africa: modelling the labour market transmission," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(8-9), pages 911-925, December.
  5. Francois, Joseph & Rojas-Romagosa, Hugo, 2005. "Equity, welfare, and the setting of trade policy in general equilibrium," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3731, The World Bank.
  6. Adams, Philip D., 2005. "Interpretation of results from CGE models such as GTAP," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 941-959, November.
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