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Assessing The Effects of Trade Liberalization on Wage Inequalities in Egypt: A Microsimulation Analysis

Author

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  • Rana Hendy

    () (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne & Paris School of Economics)

  • Chahir Zaki

    () (Faculty of Economics and Political Sciences, Economics Department, Cairo University)

Abstract

This paper develops a microsimulation analysis to evaluate the impact of trade liberalization policies in Egypt on income redistribution. Our analysis aims at identifying the effects of those measures on redistribution aspects. For this, we rely on a macro – micro approach integrating results obtained from a discrete choice model of labor supply in a Computable General Equilibrium model (CGE). In the empirical work, we use the Egyptian Labor Market and Panel Survey (ELMPS) of 1998 and 2006 as well as the Social Accounting Matrix (SAM) of 2001. This assessment allows us to find out to what extent such macroeconomic policies affect, on the microeconomic level, females poverty, wages and employment opportunities.

Suggested Citation

  • Rana Hendy & Chahir Zaki, 2010. "Assessing The Effects of Trade Liberalization on Wage Inequalities in Egypt: A Microsimulation Analysis," Working Papers 555, Economic Research Forum, revised 10 Jan 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:555
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    Cited by:

    1. Chakraborty, Lekha S & Singh, Yadawendra, 2018. "Fiscal Policy, as the “Employer of Last Resort”: Impact of Direct fiscal transfer (MGNREGA) on Labour Force Participation Rates in India," MPRA Paper 85225, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Eduardo Amaral Haddad & Michael L. Lahr & Dina N. Elshahawany & Moisés Vassallo, 2016. "Regional analysis of domestic integration in Egypt: an interregional CGE approach," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 5(1), pages 1-33, December.
    3. Purva Khera, 2016. "Macroeconomic Impacts of Gender Inequality and Informality in India," IMF Working Papers 16/16, International Monetary Fund.

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