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Trade Liberalization, Gender Segmentation, and Wage Discrimination: Evidence from Egypt

Listed author(s):
  • Fatma El-Hamidi

    ()

    (Department of Economics & GSPIA, University of Pittsburgh, USA)

This study evaluates the impact of trade liberalization and reductions in trade barriers on gender wage inequality in Egypt by using recent Egypt Labor Market Panel Survey data (ELMPS 06) and comparing two years representing an early stage (1998) and an advanced stage in trade liberalization (2006). The analysis focuses on private sector workers, and compares workers in tradable sectors (sectors in direct competition with the foreign trade) with workers in non-tradable sectors (not in direct competition with foreign goods). Not only is wage discrimination observed regardless of sector of employment, but deterioration is also detected. Results also indicate that tradable sectors experience proportionately higher levels of wage differences between men and women than non-tradable sectors.

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Paper provided by Economic Research Forum in its series Working Papers with number 414.

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Length: 24
Date of creation: 06 Jan 2008
Date of revision: 06 Jan 2008
Publication status: Published by The Economic Research Forum (ERF)
Handle: RePEc:erg:wpaper:414
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  1. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Introduction to "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings"," NBER Chapters, in: Schooling, Experience, and Earnings, pages 1-4 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. -, 2007. "United States economic outlook: quarterly developments," Oficina de la CEPAL en Washington (Estudios e Investigaciones) 28863, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
  3. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
  4. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57, 03.
  5. Revenga, Ana, 1997. "Employment and Wage Effects of Trade Liberalization: The Case of Mexican Manufacturing," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(3), pages 20-43, July.
  6. Jacob A. Mincer, 1974. "Schooling, Experience, and Earnings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number minc74-1, April.
  7. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
  8. Noel Gaston & Daniel Trefler, 1994. "Protection, Trade, and Wages: Evidence from U.S. Manufacturing," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 47(4), pages 574-593, July.
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