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Economic Significance of Specific Export Promotion on Poverty Reduction and Inter- Industry Growth of Ethiopia

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  • Chala, Zelalem T.
  • Norton, George W.
  • Grant, Jason H.

Abstract

Micro simulated general equilibrium approach was used to analyze the economic significance of the current export promotion policy of Ethiopia. Simulation results, in general, indicated little achievements of economic growth and poverty reduction under selective export promotion. In this policy approach, only rural households were able to acquire higher income and lower poverty incidence. These achievements however were transmitted to small and big urban households when export promotion was assumed to be implemented across the board of all agricultural activities. Significant economic and inter-industrial growths were attained when the coffee industry was given equal policy treatments like other export agriculture

Suggested Citation

  • Chala, Zelalem T. & Norton, George W. & Grant, Jason H., 2010. "Economic Significance of Specific Export Promotion on Poverty Reduction and Inter- Industry Growth of Ethiopia," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61739, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea10:61739
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.61739
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Saeed Solaymani, 2016. "Impacts of energy subsidy reform on poverty and income inequality in Malaysia," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2707-2723, November.
    2. Nora Yusma Bte Mohamed Yusoff & Hussain Ali Bekhet, 2016. "Impacts of Energy Subsidy Reforms on the Industrial Energy Structures in the Malaysian Economy: A Computable General Equilibrium Approach," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 6(1), pages 88-97.

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