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Reaction to technology shocks in Markov-switching structural VARs: Identification via heteroskedasticity

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  • Netsunajev, Aleksei

Abstract

The paper reconsiders the conflicting results in the debate connected to the effects of technology shocks on hours worked. Given the major dissatisfaction with the just-identifying long-run restrictions, I analyze whether the restrictions used in the literature are consistent with the data. Modeling volatility of shocks using Markov switching structure allows to obtain additional identifying information and perform tests of the restrictions that were just-identifying in classical structural vector autoregressive analysis. Using six ways of identifying technology shocks, I find that not all of them are supported by the data. There is no clear-cut evidence in favor of a positive reaction of hours to technology shocks.

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  • Netsunajev, Aleksei, 2013. "Reaction to technology shocks in Markov-switching structural VARs: Identification via heteroskedasticity," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 51-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:36:y:2013:i:c:p:51-62
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jmacro.2012.12.005
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lütkepohl, Helmut & Netšunajev, Aleksei, 2017. "Structural vector autoregressions with heteroskedasticity: A review of different volatility models," Econometrics and Statistics, Elsevier, vol. 1(C), pages 2-18.
    2. Ivan Mendieta-Munoz & Mengheng Li, 2019. "The Multivariate Simultaneous Unobserved Compenents Model and Identification via Heteroskedasticity," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2019_06, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    3. Lütkepohl, Helmut & Schlaak, Thore, 2019. "Bootstrapping impulse responses of structural vector autoregressive models identified through GARCH," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 41-61.
    4. Helmut Lütkepohl & Anton Velinov, 2016. "Structural Vector Autoregressions: Checking Identifying Long-Run Restrictions Via Heteroskedasticity," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 30(2), pages 377-392, April.
    5. Lütkepohl, Helmut & Netšunajev, Aleksei, 2017. "Structural vector autoregressions with smooth transition in variances," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 43-57.
    6. Juan Carlos Cuestas & Bo Tang, 2015. "Exchange Rate Changes and Stock Returns in China: A Markov Switching SVAR Approach," Working Papers 2015024, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    7. Helmut Lutkepohl & Tomasz Wo'zniak, 2018. "Bayesian Inference for Structural Vector Autoregressions Identified by Markov-Switching Heteroskedasticity," Papers 1811.08167, arXiv.org.
    8. Dmitry Kulikov & Aleksei Netsunajev, 2016. "Identifying Shocks in Structural VAR models via heteroskedasticity: a Bayesian approach," Bank of Estonia Working Papers wp2015-8, Bank of Estonia, revised 19 Feb 2016.
    9. Noel Gaston & Gulasekaran Rajaguru, 2015. "A Markov-switching structural vector autoregressive model of boom and bust in the Australian labour market," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(4), pages 1271-1299, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technology shocks; Markov switching model; Heteroskedasticity;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models

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