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Financial friction in an emerging economy

  • Hwang, Yu-Ning

The objective of this study is to evaluate the role of the frictional domestic credit market in an emerging country by using a small-open-economy DSGE model with a banking sector. The calibration results show that the financial friction does not significantly influence the macroeconomic effects of the shocks to the domestic productivity, foreign interest rate and export demand. We also evaluate whether and how the trade and financial openness can influence the effects of the domestic financial shocks that in turn affect the supply of loans in the credit market. We show that greater trade and financial openness can reduce the macroeconomic impacts of the domestic financial distress. Under a more open international capital market, the capital outflow caused by the domestic financial shock does not lead to drastic exchange rate variation. This helps dampen the adverse effects of the financial distress on the economy.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of International Money and Finance.

Volume (Year): 31 (2012)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 212-227

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:31:y:2012:i:2:p:212-227
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