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Understanding the money-prices relationship under low and high inflation regimes: Argentina 1977-2006


  • Basco, Emiliano
  • D'Amato, Laura
  • Garegnani, Lorena


We study the regime dependence of the money-prices relationship, focusing on Argentina's experience over the last 30 years. Using descriptive and cointegration analysis we find that proportionality holds for the high inflation period but weakens once inflation lowers. Money velocity correlates positively with money growth under high inflation, while this relation reverts under low inflation. VAR analysis allows to identify the key role of inflation expectations in driving the short-run dynamics of the money growth-inflation relationship under high inflation. Although this relationship weakens under low inflation, money continues to play a role in explaining inflation dynamics in Argentina.

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  • Basco, Emiliano & D'Amato, Laura & Garegnani, Lorena, 2009. "Understanding the money-prices relationship under low and high inflation regimes: Argentina 1977-2006," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1182-1203, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:28:y:2009:i:7:p:1182-1203

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Claudiu Tiberiu Albulescu & Daniel Goyeau & Cornel Oros, 2015. "On the Long Run Money-Prices Relationship in CEE Countries," Economic Research Guardian, Weissberg Publishing, vol. 5(1), pages 73-96, June.
    2. Jiang, Chun & Chang, Tsangyao & Li, Xiao-Lin, 2015. "Money growth and inflation in China: New evidence from a wavelet analysis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 249-261.
    3. Olaolu Richard Olayeni & Aviral Kumar Tiwari & Reza Sherafatian-Jahromi & Olagbaju Ifeolu Oladiran, 2014. "Inflation, output gap, and money in Malaysia: evidence from wavelet coherence," International Journal of Computational Economics and Econometrics, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 4(3/4), pages 320-338.


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