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Why are African commodity exchanges languishing? A case study of the Zambian Agricultural Commodity Exchange

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  • Sitko, Nicholas J.
  • Jayne, T.S.

Abstract

Food price volatility and high transactions costs remain major problems in African food markets. These persistent problems provide a strong theoretical justification for the development of commodity exchanges. However, the majority of African commodity exchanges remain underdeveloped. Through a case study of the Zambian Agricultural Commodity Exchange (ZAMACE), this article explores why agricultural commodity exchanges in the region have thus far failed to develop into sustainable trading platforms and identifies the most important changes needed to enhance their performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Sitko, Nicholas J. & Jayne, T.S., 2012. "Why are African commodity exchanges languishing? A case study of the Zambian Agricultural Commodity Exchange," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 275-282.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:37:y:2012:i:3:p:275-282
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2012.02.015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marcel Fafchamps, 2004. "Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa: Theory and Evidence," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262062364, January.
    2. Smale, Melinda & Byerlee, Derek R. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Maize Revolutions in Sub-Saharan Africa," Miscellaneous Publications 113651, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Coulter, J. & Onumah, G., 2002. "The role of warehouse receipt systems in enhanced commodity marketing and rural livelihoods in Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 319-337, August.
    4. Colin Poulton & Jonathan Kydd & Andrew Dorward, 2006. "Overcoming Market Constraints on Pro-Poor Agricultural Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(3), pages 243-277, May.
    5. Byerlee, Derek & Jayne, T.S. & Myers, Robert J., 2006. "Managing food price risks and instability in a liberalizing market environment: Overview and policy options," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 275-287, August.
    6. Chapoto, Antony & Jayne, Thomas S., 2009. "The Impacts of Trade Barriers and Market Interventions on Maize Price Predictability: Evidence from Eastern and Southern Africa," Food Security International Development Working Papers 56798, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. Rashid, Shahidur & Winter-Nelson, Alex & Garcia, Philip, 2010. "Purpose and potential for commodity exchanges in African economies:," IFPRI discussion papers 1035, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Mason, Nicole M. & Jayne, T.S. & Chapoto, Antony & Donovan, Cynthia, 2011. "Putting the 2007/2008 global food crisis in longer-term perspective: Trends in staple food affordability in urban Zambia and Kenya," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 350-367, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:4:p:e88-e106 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Gelaw, Fekadu & Speelman, Stijn & Van Huylenbroeck, Guido, 2016. "Farmers’ marketing preferences in local coffee markets: Evidence from a choice experiment in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 92-102.
    3. Jayne, T.S. & Sturgess, Chris & Kopicki, Ron & Sitko, Nicholas, 2014. "Agricultural Commodity Exchanges and the Development of Grain Markets and Trade in Africa: A Review of Recent Experience," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 188568, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Liesbeth Dries & Domenico Dentoni, 2015. "Private sector investments to create market-supporting institutions: The case of Malawian Agricultural Commodity Exchange," Working Papers 2015/08, Maastricht School of Management.
    5. Meijerink, Gerdien & Bulte, Erwin & Alemu, Dawit, 2014. "Formal institutions and social capital in value chains: The case of the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 1-12.
    6. Sitko, Nicholas J. & Kuteya, Auckland N., 2013. "The Maize Price Spike of 2012/13: Understanding the Paradox of High Prices despite Abundant Supplies," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 171871, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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