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Transaction costs and the market access in Sub-Saharan Africa: The case of maize

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  • Bignebat, Celine
  • Piot-Lepetit, Isabelle

Abstract

Staple crop production in developing countries contributes decisively to food safety. In Sub- Saharan Africa however, the Green Revolution, aiming at sustaining agricultural productivity growth was mostly viewed as not successful, compared to what happened in Asian countries. There is a widespread agreement on the fact that this statement is especially related to the food marketing environment and to transaction costs. Stagnant food crop productivity and poor market performance may then be at stake. The paper aims at identifying the relative importance of marketing and production behaviours. It focuses on the case of maize in Sub- Saharan Africa. The results show that, beyond production choices, two aspects should be taken into account in order to understand commercialisation decisions: the role of intermediation and that of storage.

Suggested Citation

  • Bignebat, Celine & Piot-Lepetit, Isabelle, 2015. "Transaction costs and the market access in Sub-Saharan Africa: The case of maize," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211341, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:211341
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/211341/files/Bignebat-Transaction%20costs%20and%20market%20access%20in%20eastern%20and%20southern%20Africa-586.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marcel Fafchamps, 2004. "Market Institutions in Sub-Saharan Africa: Theory and Evidence," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262062364, January.
    2. Harold Alderman & Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & John A. Maluccio & Susan Watkins, 2001. "Attrition in Longitudinal Household Survey Data," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 5(4), pages 79-124, November.
    3. Smale, Melinda & Byerlee, Derek & Jayne, Thom, 2011. "Maize revolutions in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5659, The World Bank.
    4. Renkow, Mitch & Hallstrom, Daniel G. & Karanja, Daniel D., 2004. "Rural infrastructure, transactions costs and market participation in Kenya," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 349-367, February.
    5. Fafchamps, Marcel & Minten, Bart, 2001. "Property Rights in a Flea Market Economy," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(2), pages 229-267, January.
    6. John A. Maluccio, 2004. "Using Quality of Interview Information to Assess Nonrandom Attrition Bias in Developing-Country Panel Data," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(1), pages 91-109, February.
    7. Barrett, Christopher B., 2008. "Smallholder market participation: Concepts and evidence from eastern and southern Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 299-317, August.
    8. Smale, Melinda & Jayne, T.S., 2003. "Maize in Eastern and Southern Africa: 'seeds' of success in retrospect," EPTD discussion papers 97, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Jayne, Thomas S. & Mason, Nicole M. & Myers, Robert J. & Ferris, John N. & Mather, David & Sitko, Nicholas & Beaver, Margaret & Lenski, Natalie & Chapoto, Antony & Boughton, Duncan, 2010. "Patterns and Trends in Food Staples Markets in Eastern and Southern Africa: Toward the Identification of Priority Investments and Strategies for Developing Markets and Promoting Smallholder Productivi," Food Security International Development Working Papers 62148, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    10. Evenson, Robert E., 2001. "Economic impacts of agricultural research and extension," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 11, pages 573-628 Elsevier.
    11. Ephraim Chirwa, 2005. "Adoption of fertiliser and hybrid seeds by smallholder maize farmers in Southern Malawi," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 1-12.
    12. Abdulai, Awudu, 2000. "Spatial price transmission and asymmetry in the Ghanaian maize market," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 327-349, December.
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    14. Stephan J. Goetz, 1992. "A Selectivity Model of Household Food Marketing Behavior in Sub-Saharan Africa," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 74(2), pages 444-452.
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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries; International Development;

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