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Drivers of Market Participation Decisions among Small-scale Farmers in Yam Growing Areas of Nigeria and Ghana

Author

Listed:
  • Mignouna, D.B.
  • Abdoulaye, T.
  • Alene, A.
  • Akinola, A.A.
  • Manyong, V.M.

Abstract

Participation in agricultural markets could be the main weapon against hunger to lift millions of poor farmers out of poverty traps. Unfortunately, most of the potential beneficiaries are constrained by several factors in their quest to participate in the yam market. This study, thus, clarified the underpinning drivers of market participation among small-scale farmers in yam belt of West Africa. Using a multistage random sample of 1400 households, the study tests the hypothesis that factors affecting farmers’ decision to participate are not necessarily the same as those affecting the extent of participation. Non-price constraints played a significant role in determining decisions on market participation. Policies that reduce transactions costs and induce farmers to commercialize could be critical alternatives to policies based on price to promote a marketed surplus and the commercialization of agriculture by yam farmers and thereby alleviate poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Mignouna, D.B. & Abdoulaye, T. & Alene, A. & Akinola, A.A. & Manyong, V.M., 2015. "Drivers of Market Participation Decisions among Small-scale Farmers in Yam Growing Areas of Nigeria and Ghana," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 230219, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:230219
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.230219
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/230219/files/MignounaEtAl.pdf
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    Keywords

    Farm Management; Marketing;

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