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Does social exclusion influence multiple channel use? The interconnections with community, happiness, and well-being

Listed author(s):
  • Dennis, Charles
  • Alamanos, Eleftherios
  • Papagiannidis, Savvas
  • Bourlakis, Michael
Registered author(s):

    This paper examines how social exclusion affects consumer use of multiple shopping channels (traditional stores, online by computer and mobile retailing by cell phone) and how these choices affect consumers' happiness and wellbeing. The findings from an online survey (n=1368) in the United States indicate that socially-excluded people spend more time shopping by all three channels, with the most significant being the cell phone. The latter channel is also more significant for younger respondents and for those who report a mobility/disability issue. Time spent on traditional store shopping and shopping by cell phone both have significant positive effects on happiness and wellbeing. Shopping by cell phone significantly ameliorates the negative effects of social exclusion on happiness and wellbeing for consumers with mobility/disability issues. The paper also includes practical implications for retail marketing managers' and policy makers' communication strategies.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0148296315003562
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Business Research.

    Volume (Year): 69 (2016)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 1061-1070

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jbrese:v:69:y:2016:i:3:p:1061-1070
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.08.019
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jbusres

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    1. Childers, Terry L. & Kaufman-Scarborough, Carol, 2009. "Expanding opportunities for online shoppers with disabilities," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(5), pages 572-578, May.
    2. Farag, Sendy & Schwanen, Tim & Dijst, Martin & Faber, Jan, 2007. "Shopping online and/or in-store? A structural equation model of the relationships between e-shopping and in-store shopping," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 125-141, February.
    3. Jaehoon Lee & L. J. Shrum, 2012. "Conspicuous Consumption versus Charitable Behavior in Response to Social Exclusion: A Differential Needs Explanation," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 39(3), pages 530-544.
    4. Schuetz, Jenny & Kolko, Jed & Meltzer, Rachel, 2012. "Are poor neighborhoods “retail deserts”?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 269-285.
    5. El Hedhli, Kamel & Chebat, Jean-Charles & Sirgy, M. Joseph, 2013. "Shopping well-being at the mall: Construct, antecedents, and consequences," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(7), pages 856-863.
    6. John Pucher & John Renne, 2005. "Rural mobility and mode choice: Evidence from the 2001 National Household Travel Survey," Transportation, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 165-186, 03.
    7. Stanley, John K. & Hensher, David A. & Stanley, Janet R. & Vella-Brodrick, Dianne, 2011. "Mobility, social exclusion and well-being: Exploring the links," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(8), pages 789-801, October.
    8. Taylor, Mark P. & Jenkins, Stephen P. & Sacker, Amanda, 2011. "Financial capability and psychological health," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 710-723.
    9. Bruner, Gordon II & Kumar, Anand, 2005. "Explaining consumer acceptance of handheld Internet devices," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 58(5), pages 553-558, May.
    10. MacInnis, Deborah J & Price, Linda L, 1987. " The Role of Imagery in Information Processing: Review and Extensions," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(4), pages 473-491, March.
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