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'New' and 'Old' Social Risks: Life Cycle and Social Class Perspectives on Social Exclusion in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Christopher T. Whelan

    (Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI))

  • Bertrand Maitre

    (Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI))

Abstract

The life cycle concept has come to have considerable prominence in Irish social policy debate. However, this has occurred without any systematic effort to link its usage to the broader literature relating to a concept. Nor has there been any detailed consideration of how we should set about operationalising the concept. In this paper we make use of Irish EU-SILC 2005 data in developing a life cycle schema and considering its relationship to a range of indicators of social exclusion. At the European level renewed interest in the life cycle concept is associated with the increasing emphasis on the distinction between ?new? and ?old? social risks and the notion that the former are more ?individualised?. An important variant of the individualisation argument considers globalisation to be associated with increased but much more widely diffused levels of risk. Inequality and poverty rather than being differentially distributed between social classes are thought to vary between phases in the average work life. This position contrasts sharply with the emphasis on cumulative disadvantage over the life course. Our findings suggest that both the ?death of social class? and cumulative disadvantage over the life cycle theses are greatly over blown. A more accurate appreciation of the importance of new and old social risks and the manner in which they are both shaped by and influenced by welfare state strategies requires that we systematically investigate the manner in which factors such as the social class and the life cycle interact. Our evidence suggests that such an approach rather than leading us to jettison our concern with social class is likely, as Atkinson (2007) argues, to leave us more impressed by the degree to which the "slayers" of class are themselves ?riddled with class processes?.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2008. "'New' and 'Old' Social Risks: Life Cycle and Social Class Perspectives on Social Exclusion in Ireland," Papers WP226, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:wp226
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 1996. "Resources, Deprivation, and Poverty," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287858.
    2. Christopher Whelan & Bertrand Maître, 2006. "Comparing poverty and deprivation dynamics: Issues of reliability and validity," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 4(3), pages 303-323, December.
    3. Christopher T. Whelan, 2007. "Understanding the Implications of Choice of Deprivation Index for Measuring Consistent Poverty in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 38(2), pages 211-234.
    4. Taylor-Gooby, Peter (ed.), 2004. "New Risks, New Welfare: The Transformation of the European Welfare State," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199267279.
    5. Richard Layte & Bertrand Maître & Brian Nolan & Christopher T. Whelan, 1999. "Income, Deprivation and Economic Strain: An Analysis of the European Community Household Panel," Papers WP109, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    6. Whelan, Christopher T. & Maitre, Bertrand, 2008. "The Life Cycle Perspective on Social Inclusion in Ireland: An Analysis of EU-SILC," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS3.
    7. O'Riain,Sean, 2004. "The Politics of High Tech Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521830737.
    8. Banerjee, Abhijit Vinayak & Benabou, Roland & Mookherjee, Dilip (ed.), 2006. "Understanding Poverty," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195305203.
    9. Nolan, Brian & Whelan, Christopher T., 2011. "Poverty and Deprivation in Europe," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199588435.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Whelan & Helen Russell & Bertrand Maître, 2016. "Economic Stress and the Great Recession in Ireland: Polarization, Individualization or ‘Middle Class Squeeze’?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(2), pages 503-526, March.
    2. Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre & Brian Nolan, 2011. "Analysing Intergenerational Influences on Income Poverty and Economic Vulnerability with EU-SILC," Working Papers 201125, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    3. repec:esr:resser:bkmnext328 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Abigail Mcknight & Brian Nolan, 2012. "GINI Intermediate Report WP 4: Social Impacts of Inequalities," GINI Discussion Papers wp4, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    5. Oliver Hümbelin & Tobias Fritschi, 2016. "Ausschluss aus dem Arbeitsmarkt. Eine Längsschnittstudie mit Administrativdaten der Sozialen Sicherheit der Schweiz," University of Bern Social Sciences Working Papers 20, University of Bern, Department of Social Sciences.
    6. repec:eso:journl:v:47:y:2016:i:4:p:477-498 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2010. "Identifying Economically Vulnerable Groups as the Economic Crisis Emerged," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41(4), pages 501-525.
    8. Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2012. "Identifying Childhood Deprivation: How Well Do National Indicators of Poverty and Social Exclusion in Ireland Perform?," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 43(2), pages 251-272.
    9. Maite Blázquez & Elena Cottini & Ainhoa Herrarte, 2014. "The socioeconomic gradient in health: how important is material deprivation?," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 12(2), pages 239-264, June.
    10. Maite Blázquez Cuesta & Santiago Budría, 2014. "Deprivation and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from Panel Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(4), pages 655-682, December.
    11. Thomas Leoni, 2015. "Welfare state adjustment to new social risks in the post-crisis scenario. A review with focus on the social investment perspective," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 89, WWWforEurope.
    12. Christopher T. Whelan & Brian Nolan & Bertrand Maítre, 2016. "The Great Recession and the Changing Distribution of Economic Stress across Income Classes and the Life Course in Ireland: A Comparative Perspective," Working Papers 201603, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    13. Olivier Pintelon & Bea Cantillon & Karel Van den Bosch & Christopher T. Whelan, 2011. "The Social Stratification of Social Risks: Class and Responsibility in the 'New' Welfare State," Working Papers 201123, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    14. repec:esr:resser:bkmnext226 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:esr:resser:bkmnext213 is not listed on IDEAS

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