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Ausschluss aus dem Arbeitsmarkt. Eine Längsschnittstudie mit Administrativdaten der Sozialen Sicherheit der Schweiz

Author

Listed:
  • Oliver Hümbelin
  • Tobias Fritschi

Abstract

Dieser Artikel untersucht das Risiko des Ausscheidens aus dem Arbeitsmarkt im Längsschnitt auf der Grundlage von verknüpften Administrativdaten der Sozialen Sicherheit. Auswertungen über einen Zeitraum von fünf Jahre zeigen starke Effekte entlang vertikaler Schichtmerkmale (Bildung, Einkommen) hinsichtlich der Abhängigkeit von Sozialleistungen. Dabei sind Kompensationseffekte zu erkennen; das Risiko geringer Bildung kann etwa mit einem einmal erreichten hohen Status im Arbeitsmarkt ausgeglichen werden. Ein Rückzug aus dem Arbeitsmarkt ohne Sozialleistungen kann schliesslich besser mit Merkmalen der horizontalen Sozialstruktur (Geschlecht, Alter, Zivilstand und Nationalität) erklärt werden. Überdurchschnittlich hohe Risiken aus dem Arbeitsmarkt auszuscheiden haben Personen im fortgeschrittenen Erwerbsalter (ab 56 Jahren), Frauen, Ausländer/innen und Verheiratete.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliver Hümbelin & Tobias Fritschi, 2016. "Ausschluss aus dem Arbeitsmarkt. Eine Längsschnittstudie mit Administrativdaten der Sozialen Sicherheit der Schweiz," University of Bern Social Sciences Working Papers 20, University of Bern, Department of Social Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:bss:wpaper:20
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    File URL: http://repec.sowi.unibe.ch/files/wp20/Huembelin-Fritschi-2016-Exclusion.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Werner Eichhorst & Otto Kaufmann & Regina Konle-Seidl (ed.), 2008. "Bringing the Jobless into Work?," Springer Books, Springer, number 978-3-540-77435-8, September.
    2. Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2008. "“New” and “Old” Social Risks: Life Cycle and Social Class Perspectives on Social Exclusion in Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 39(2), pages 131-156.
    3. A. Colin Cameron & Pravin K. Trivedi, 2010. "Microeconometrics Using Stata, Revised Edition," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, number musr, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Arbeitsmarkt; Exklusion; soziale Ungleichheit; Administrativdaten; Soziale Sicherheit;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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