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Healthcare Seeking Behavior among Self-help Group Households in Rural Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, India

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  • Raza, W.A.
  • Panda, P.
  • Van de Poel, E.
  • Dror, D.M.
  • Bedi, A.S.

Abstract

In recent years, supported by non-governmental organizations (NGOs), a number of demand-driven community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes have been functioning in rural India. These CBHI schemes may design their benefit packages according to local priorities. In this paper we examine healthcare seeking behavior among self-help group households, with a view to understanding the implications for benefit packages offered by such schemes. This study is based on data from rural locations in two of India’s poorest states.1 We find that the majority of respondents do access some form of care and that there is overwhelming use of private services. Within private services, non-degree allopathic providers (NDAP) also called rural medical practitioners account for a substantial share and the main reason to access such unqualified providers is their proximity. The direct cost of care does not appear to have a bearing on choice of provider. Given the importance of proximity in determining provider choices, several solutions could be foreseen, such as mobile medical tours to villages, and/or that insurance schemes consider coverage of transportation costs and reimbursement of foregone earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • Raza, W.A. & Panda, P. & Van de Poel, E. & Dror, D.M. & Bedi, A.S., 2013. "Healthcare Seeking Behavior among Self-help Group Households in Rural Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, India," ISS Working Papers - General Series 50172, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:euriss:50172
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:pri:rpdevs:hammer_the_impact_of_recall_periods_on_reported_morbidity_and_health_seeking_behavior.pdf is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Devadasan, Narayanan & Ranson, Kent & Van Damme, Wim & Acharya, Akash & Criel, Bart, 2006. "The landscape of community health insurance in India: An overview based on 10 case studies," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 78(2-3), pages 224-234, October.
    3. Erlyana, Erlyana & Damrongplasit, Kannika Kampanya & Melnick, Glenn, 2011. "Expanding health insurance to increase health care utilization: Will it have different effects in rural vs. urban areas?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 100(2-3), pages 273-281, May.
    4. Bijan J. Borah, 2006. "A mixed logit model of health care provider choice: analysis of NSS data for rural India," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 915-932.
    5. Panda, P. & Chakraborty, A. & Dror, D.M. & Bedi, A.S., 2013. "Enrollment in community based health insurance schemes in rural Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, India," ISS Working Papers - General Series 555, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    6. Dror, David Mark & Radermacher, Ralf & Koren, Ruth, 2007. "Willingness to pay for health insurance among rural and poor persons: Field evidence from seven micro health insurance units in India," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 12-27, June.
    7. Dor, Avi & Gertler, Paul & van der Gaag, Jacques, 1987. "Non-price rationing and the choice of medical care providers in rural Cote d'Ivoire," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 291-304, December.
    8. Das, Jishnu & Hammer, Jeffrey & Sánchez-Paramo, Carolina, 2012. "The impact of recall periods on reported morbidity and health seeking behavior," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 76-88.
    9. Sisira Sarma, 2009. "Demand for outpatient healthcare," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 265-277, December.
    10. Philip H. Brown & Caroline Theoharides, 2009. "Health‐seeking behavior and hospital choice in China's New Cooperative Medical System," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S2), pages 47-64, July.
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    12. David E. Sahn & Stephen D. Younger & Garance Genicot, 2003. "The Demand for Health Care Services in Rural Tanzania," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 65(2), pages 241-260, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Raza, Wameq & van de Poel, Ellen & Panda, Pradeep, 2016. "Analyses of enrolment, dropout and effectiveness of RSBY in northern rural India," MPRA Paper 70081, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Healthcare seeking behavior; Non-degree allopathic providers; Community-based Health Insurance schemes; Self-help group; India;

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