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A leverage ratio rule for capital adequacy

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  • Jarrow, Robert

Abstract

This paper studies the economic foundations for maximum leverage ratio capital adequacy rules. The paper makes three contributions to the literature. First, we show how to determine the maximum leverage ratio such that the probability of insolvency is less than some predetermined quantity. Two, we show that a leverage ratio rule controls for the same risks as does a Value-at-Risk (VaR) capital adequacy rule. Third, we argue that leverage ratio rules are better than VaR rules because they are more intuitive and easier to compare across firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Jarrow, Robert, 2013. "A leverage ratio rule for capital adequacy," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 973-976.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jbfina:v:37:y:2013:i:3:p:973-976
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jbankfin.2012.10.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Blum, Jürg M., 2008. "Why 'Basel II' may need a leverage ratio restriction," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1699-1707, August.
    2. Ines Drumond, 2009. "Bank Capital Requirements, Business Cycle Fluctuations And The Basel Accords: A Synthesis," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(5), pages 798-830, December.
    3. Robert Jarrow, 2007. "A Critique of Revised Basel II," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer;Western Finance Association, vol. 32(1), pages 1-16, October.
    4. Berger, Allen N. & Herring, Richard J. & Szego, Giorgio P., 1995. "The role of capital in financial institutions," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3-4), pages 393-430, June.
    5. VanHoose, David, 2007. "Theories of bank behavior under capital regulation," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 3680-3697, December.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Georgescu, Oana-Maria, 2015. "Contagion in the interbank market: Funding versus regulatory constraints," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 1-18.
    2. Popoyan, Lilit & Napoletano, Mauro & Roventini, Andrea, 2017. "Taming macroeconomic instability: Monetary and macro-prudential policy interactions in an agent-based model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 117-140.
    3. Annalisa Bucalossi & Antonio Scalia, 2016. "Leverage ratio, central bank operations and repo market," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 347, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    4. Berardi, Simone & Marcelletti, Alessandra, 2017. "Optimal Bank Capital Requirements: An Asymmetric Information Perspective," SEP Working Papers 2017/2, LUISS School of European Political Economy.
    5. Sebastian Krug & Matthias Lengnick & Hans-Werner Wohltmann, 2014. "The impact of Basel III on financial (in)stability: an agent-based credit network approach," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(12), pages 1917-1932, December.
    6. Robert Jarrow, 2013. "Capital adequacy rules, catastrophic firm failure, and systemic risk," Review of Derivatives Research, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 219-231, October.
    7. Olivier Bruno & André Cartapanis & Eric Nasica, 2013. "Bank leverage, financial fragility and prudential regulation," Working Papers halshs-00853701, HAL.
    8. Chernykh, Lucy & Cole, Rebel A., 2015. "How should we measure bank capital adequacy for triggering Prompt Corrective Action? A (simple) proposal," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 20(C), pages 131-143.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Leverage ratios; Capital adequacy rules; Value-at-risk; Collateral requirements; Haircuts;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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