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The effect of birth order on the probability of university enrolment

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  • Kuba, Radim
  • Flegr, Jaroslav
  • Havlíček, Jan

Abstract

The birth order influences various psychological characteristics ranging from personality traits to sexual behaviour. Yet while many studies suggest that firstborn children are likely to achieve a higher educational level than their siblings, other studies reported no such effect, which may be due to various modulating factors such as sex and family size. In the present study, we have therefore tested the effect of birth order on the probability of university enrolment while taking these possibly modulating factors into consideration.

Suggested Citation

  • Kuba, Radim & Flegr, Jaroslav & Havlíček, Jan, 2018. "The effect of birth order on the probability of university enrolment," Intelligence, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 61-72.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:intell:v:70:y:2018:i:c:p:61-72
    DOI: 10.1016/j.intell.2018.08.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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