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Does climate change information affect stated risks of pine beetle impacts on forests? An application of the exchangeability method

  • Cerroni, Simone
  • Shaw, W. Douglass

Risks are an essential feature of future climate change impacts. We explore whether knowledge that climate change might be the source of increasing pine beetle impacts on public or private forests affects stated risk estimates of damage, elicited using the exchangeability method. We find that across subjects the difference between public and private forest status does not influence stated risks, but the group told that global warming is the cause of pine beetle damage has significantly higher risk perceptions than the group not given this information.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1389934112000925
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Forest Policy and Economics.

Volume (Year): 22 (2012)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 72-84

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Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:22:y:2012:i:c:p:72-84
DOI: 10.1016/j.forpol.2012.04.001
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forpol

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