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Testing for hypothetical bias in willingness to support a reforestation program

  • Krawczyk, Michał

This study measures hypothetical bias in CVM-based estimates of willingness to support a forest protection and restoration program in Poland. It does so in two parallel ways: within- and between-subjects. To this end, participants are asked to vote in a referendum on an NGO-led reforestation project for various per-capita cost levels. They do so either directly or, as a surprise continuation, after a hypothetical analogue. Both methods deliver a similar (and substantial) level of hypothetical bias – it is slightly higher, but not significantly so, in the between-subject comparison. This suggests that hypothetical bias in this context is not primarily driven by such factors as consistency seeking or impression management.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Forest Economics.

Volume (Year): 18 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 282-289

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Handle: RePEc:eee:foreco:v:18:y:2012:i:4:p:282-289
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