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A retrospective analysis of benefits and impacts of U.S. renewable portfolio standards

Listed author(s):
  • Barbose, Galen
  • Wiser, Ryan
  • Heeter, Jenny
  • Mai, Trieu
  • Bird, Lori
  • Bolinger, Mark
  • Carpenter, Alberta
  • Heath, Garvin
  • Keyser, David
  • Macknick, Jordan
  • Mills, Andrew
  • Millstein, Dev
Registered author(s):

    As states consider revising or developing renewable portfolio standards (RPS), they are evaluating policy costs, benefits, and other impacts. We present the first U. S. national-level assessment of state RPS program benefits and impacts, focusing on new renewable electricity resources used to meet RPS compliance obligations in 2013. In our central-case scenario, reductions in life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from displaced fossil fuel-generated electricity resulted in $2.2 billion of global benefits. Health and environmental benefits from reductions in criteria air pollutants (sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter 2.5) were even greater, estimated at $5.2 billion in the central case. Further benefits accrued in the form of reductions in water withdrawals and consumption for power generation. Finally, although best considered resource transfers rather than net societal benefits, new renewable electricity generation used for RPS compliance in 2013 also supported nearly 200,000 U. S.-based gross jobs and reduced wholesale electricity prices and natural gas prices, saving consumers a combined $1.3–$4.9 billion. In total, the estimated benefits and impacts well-exceed previous estimates of RPS compliance costs.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421516303408
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Policy.

    Volume (Year): 96 (2016)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 645-660

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:96:y:2016:i:c:p:645-660
    DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2016.06.035
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/enpol

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